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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I thought I would post up my experience installing a 4" Clutch Fan in my '14 Cat (Team Clutch).

I have the Alba Belt Temp Gauge, and when I race short course the temperature gets up to 180 quick and I have seen 195 before in the summer, the belts blow at approximately 205. I have said before that I don't believe every Wildcat needs a blower, especially with the Team Clutches, but if you run full throttle for long periods of time, then I'd put on the temp gauge kit first and if you're getting hotter than you like, install the fan. If you don't really need a fan, then don't put it on for a couple reasons: 1.) It's a PITA to put in. 2.) Wiring things is no fun 3.) You have to take pretty much all the plastics off to get to it. 4.) If for some reason the fan fails you've just blocked most of the air flow. 5.) It adds a bit more noise.

If you're going to put a fan in, man up and install the 4" one, not that much more work and way better air flow. Although it is a seriously tight fit, so it'll take some time to get it in there just right.

Here's what I bought: Atwood 4" Quiet Blower ($24 on Amazon), 3" to 4" 90 Degree Hose ($14 on eBay), Wiring Harness ($16 on Amazon). You'll also need a standard 2 Way Flat Connector (pic in the next post, I bought mine at O'Reillys Auto Parts in the trailer wiring section), bolts to mount the fan (info below), a bolt to mount the wiring relay if you want, a few butt splice connectors, a 4" hose clamp, and 5" hose clamp. Hopefully this list will keep you from having to go to the store three times like I did.
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Your biggest issue getting the 4" fan to fit is the boot pushes the fan too far off center to fit back between the plastics, and it pushes the fan down too far and it hits the battery. To keep the fan from hitting the battery I cut about an inch off the bottom of the boot that connects to the fan. This still wasn't quite enough, so I cut down the actual fan shroud to clear the battery. To combat the fan being off center, I trimmed both ends of the boot to be angled, this brings the fan back to the center. This whole process is alot easier to do if you have both back plastic panels removed, then you can screw the aluminum intake plate back onto the plastics on the ground, allowing you to actually see what in the heck is going on and incurring many less four letter words. Before you take everything off the machine though, draw a line on the aluminum of approximately how high the battery is so you can keep the fan up high enough.
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
After you think you have it positioned correctly, keyword here being ‘think’, put the driver’s side plastic in the machine again and screw the aluminum plate to it. From here you can put the intake tubes back through the aluminum, install the elbow, clamps, and the fan, and make sure the fan will 1.) Clear the battery. 2.) Fit behind the plastic housing. 3.) The bolts to mount the fan don’t hit the motor. After you’re satisfied with the fit, drill the holes in the aluminum for mounting the fan. I used 1/4” pan head bolts, 1" long, with lock nuts and a piece of rubber between the fan and the aluminum to hopefully absorb vibrations. I installed them from the back side so they wouldn’t hit the motor.
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Next is wiring it all up. I love those wiring harnesses off Amazon, I have two more running my light bars. They’re big time savers because you just hook them up to the battery and you’re done. Don’t try to save money by putting one together yourself, you’re just wasting time IMO. I mount the relay behind the seat in the square-ish looking recess and extend the leads to reach the battery. FYI, I did have one fuse vibrate its way loose on one of my light bars once, so I stuck some stuff up under the fuse cover to hold down on the fuse. You can tap into the wires running to the harness switch and attach the remote wire from the relay to key on power. The key on power can be found on a standard 2 way trailer plug right behind the dash, if you pull the block plates off the blank switches under the speedo you’ll see it. You can simply use a test light to confirm which wire it hot for key on, and which wire you need to tap into on the wiring harness switch. I kept the switch so I can also turn the fan on if the machine is not running, but hardwired it to key on power also so I won’t ‘forget’ to turn it on one day. You’ll read lots of stories on here where the one time they forgot to turn the fan on they blew the belt because it blocked that air flow.
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After you make sure it’s wired up properly, put all the plastics back on and enjoy cooler temps and lots of air!

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Great write up - Hollywood can you possibly sticky this in the how to area?

Might want to note that the ambient air temps may vary on belt failure point based on location of the pickup for the temp gauge - Cats engineers claim 260 degrees is the failure point for surface temp of belts.

Another free thing to try is to cut holes in the firewall in front of the air intake area , dirt ingestion isn't a issue as there's a 90 to get into the intakes themselves- cutting holes just allows fresh cool air vs the inlet that the oem design uses under the heat shield down by the frame.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ahh, yes fortune, that is a good thing to note that the 205 degrees is ambient air temperature, as you said the belt itself is much hotter. I bought my kit from Dean at D&P Performance, he ran one belt until it blew on purpose to see what ambient temperature it would blow at, which is where the 205 degrees came from. This temperature is with the sensor in the exhaust flange of the aluminium housing, the number would vary depending on where you put your sensor.
 

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I HAVE A 4" BLOWER ON THE BAD KITTY. BLEW TWO BELTS WiTH THE 3" BLOWER. PUT THE 4" BLOWER ON AND HAVE NOT BLEW YET. 4 BLOWER.JPG
 

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Great write up with pics have not needed one yet but the info you provided would be a great help and a great job on the details
 

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Great write up! I bet that install was close to a 6-pack.
 

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This is exactly how I installed the 4" on my 2012. A bit of a caveat though, I don't know FOR SURE but I do feel that with the large blower in that area and with it flowing 240cfm there could be a little bit of a choke point for the air intake.

Might sound crazy, but I ended up pulling my air intake tube out of that area after noticing what SEEMED to be a bit of power loss when running the blower. I could be crazy, but it did feel slightly low on power after testing it in several different ways.
 

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This is exactly how I installed the 4" on my 2012. A bit of a caveat though, I don't know FOR SURE but I do feel that with the large blower in that area and with it flowing 240cfm there could be a little bit of a choke point for the air intake.

Might sound crazy, but I ended up pulling my air intake tube out of that area after noticing what SEEMED to be a bit of power loss when running the blower. I could be crazy, but it did feel slightly low on power after testing it in several different ways.
Interesting, that would make sense though. Your 4" blower is sucking all the air out of the same place your engine air intake is trying to suck air to give the motor. Hmmm, something to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
That thought did cross my mind as I was installing the 4" fan, it takes up alot of room in there and could hypothetically limit the air flow to the intake tube. First thought is these fans flow '240cfm', but that's only unrestricted air flow, by the time you're pumping air through the smaller 3" CVT intake tube and out the CVT exhaust if you still have it attached (I have mine removed), it's way below 240cfm. I also stuck my hand down there to see with how much force it was drawing the air into the fan with, and it didn't try to suck my hand in like you experience if you put your hand over a wet/dry vac hose for example. Between these two things observations, in my opinion, the 4" fan isn't going to suck in enough air and adversely affect flow to the intake by creating a negative pressure drop in that area.

If anything hampers flow to the intake, I would think it's the actual 4" body of the fan being physically placed about 1 1/2" from the intake tube, and the intake now has to suck all the air from 'around' the housing and silicone boot. It would be interesting to see if you could put a vacuum gauge or something in the intake to measure the pressure under WOT with the 4" fan there vs without.

FOLLOW UP ON BLOWER INSTALL PERFORMANCE:
At any rate though, I took the Cat out yesterday with the blower on and did a few laps around the track. (I say only a few because on the third lap I snapped the outer on my rear axle in a hard corner, which promptly ended my day in a skidding halt, haha). It was about 85 degrees outside, and the belt hung right at 140 degrees during my run, before the fan I was running at least 170 (sometimes it would spike higher) at the same outside temperature. So I'd say remarkable improvement, I am very pleased with the results. As for concerns with decrease in power, I felt none, I was running about the same lap time and same speed on the course with the blower installed.
 

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Thanks for the write up. I havent decided if I want to add a blower or just drill my clutch cover and put those frogzskin filters on the openings. I dont do mudding or deep water. Guess I may just drill it first and if that doesnt keep it cool enough then its blower time!
 

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That thought did cross my mind as I was installing the 4" fan, it takes up alot of room in there and could hypothetically limit the air flow to the intake tube. First thought is these fans flow '240cfm', but that's only unrestricted air flow, by the time you're pumping air through the smaller 3" CVT intake tube and out the CVT exhaust if you still have it attached (I have mine removed), it's way below 240cfm. I also stuck my hand down there to see with how much force it was drawing the air into the fan with, and it didn't try to suck my hand in like you experience if you put your hand over a wet/dry vac hose for example. Between these two things observations, in my opinion, the 4" fan isn't going to suck in enough air and adversely affect flow to the intake by creating a negative pressure drop in that area.

If anything hampers flow to the intake, I would think it's the actual 4" body of the fan being physically placed about 1 1/2" from the intake tube, and the intake now has to suck all the air from 'around' the housing and silicone boot. It would be interesting to see if you could put a vacuum gauge or something in the intake to measure the pressure under WOT with the 4" fan there vs without.

FOLLOW UP ON BLOWER INSTALL PERFORMANCE:
At any rate though, I took the Cat out yesterday with the blower on and did a few laps around the track. (I say only a few because on the third lap I snapped the outer on my rear axle in a hard corner, which promptly ended my day in a skidding halt, haha). It was about 85 degrees outside, and the belt hung right at 140 degrees during my run, before the fan I was running at least 170 (sometimes it would spike higher) at the same outside temperature. So I'd say remarkable improvement, I am very pleased with the results. As for concerns with decrease in power, I felt none, I was running about the same lap time and same speed on the course with the blower installed.
next time you're running laps turn your gauge into diagnostic mode and watch the temp - I'm curious what your engine temps are running.
 

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With my 4" I've not see a temp change or any difference in performance. But with the gauges i can watch everything now, and the dust on the air filter has not gone down lol. I run around 180 to 190 while on the trails. Now that i'm thinking about it doesn't the clutch pull around 250cfm at WOT anyway
 

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Discussion Starter #16
next time you're running laps turn your gauge into diagnostic mode and watch the temp - I'm curious what your engine temps are running.
It'll be a few weeks before I get out again, I'm headed to the lake for a couple weeks! But I'll look when I get back.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
With my 4" I've not see a temp change or any difference in performance. But with the gauges i can watch everything now, and the dust on the air filter has not gone down lol. I run around 180 to 190 while on the trails. Now that i'm thinking about it doesn't the clutch pull around 250cfm at WOT anyway
Here's the link to the thread where TxChristopher did some actual measurements of air flow: http://www.wildcatforums.net/forum/wildcat-general-discussion/5106-opinions-cvt-fans-do-they-actually-help-4.html
 

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Just got mine done this weekend.

I tapped into the acc power at the fuse box after the fuse and wired it to a relay direct off the battery.
Used some nut serts to make it easy to bolt the fan to the aluminum. Trimmed the bottom of the fan alittle more extreme than others.
Modified the exhaust tube, and added the alba gauge.
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14 - 1.jpg
Might wanna check the shield if you put a 4" blower in, mine is rubbing on the engine and put a hole in it.
 
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