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Come on you expect us to believe that? We know you don't have any friends! :p

Just kidding, do you know the conditions they were riding in and if their machines are stock or not?
 

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This is all about where and how you ride.
I smoked a belt on my CanAm Commander within the first two days riding, then smoked another a week later drag racing.
CanAm couldn't believe it, did all kinds of investigation and finally decided I am abusive and I have to agree I am.
What I consider "normal" riding isn't by the standards of 90% of the world.
Its a belt, its not indestructible and the good news it is cheap and easy to change.
 

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i know of at least 12 that have not smoked a belt and 5 of them were in the sand with them. so im gonna say we need to figure out how its being rhode.....
 

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Haha. Must be power braking it.
 
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I rode 103 miles in Glamis and had no belt issues
 

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Don't rev in park,no belt isues here running 32 terminators in mud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They we running on the levee bout 70mph for bout 20 miles straight, both snorkeled one with black momba tires an the other stock tires. So not sure if they were getting enough air with the snorkels. Anyone else has theirs snorkeled yet? I have bout 80 miles on mine no troubles yet .!!
 

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I put almost 500 miles on mine at king of the hammers. I was in major rock sections, sand, and long wide open areas. I still have the same belt on it and going to be running mint 400 in couple weeks. If you are having belt issues it is probably your riding style that needs to change a little. I have thousand and thousands of miles on arctic cat and never had belt issues. I have guys with me that have and it is there driving style that broke them.
agree X2
 

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They we running on the levee bout 70mph for bout 20 miles straight, both snorkeled one with black momba tires an the other stock tires. So not sure if they were getting enough air with the snorkels. Anyone else has theirs snorkeled yet? I have bout 80 miles on mine no troubles yet .!!


tell your buddies:

"if you take a regular chevrolet or ford pickup, just your standard V8 truck, and put 37" mud tires on it and hold it to the floor, not a cruise around town, hold it to the floor, and see how long the tranny lasts. the loads from trying to pull a large heavy tire, overheats the tranny fluid in a truck, which leads to failure of the tranny. same concept in the ATV and UTVs. you put the machine under a huge load like pulling a set of 29.5" black mambas (which weigh 70lbs each) and then hold your machine to the floor and its going to cook the belt. the clutch was not slipping the belt, you just overheated it. the higher load you put on your machine, whether it be from huge tires, or tons of gear, or full windshields and top, these loads and wind resistance put more strain on your machine, the motor and driveline. since your motor is connected to the transmission by a 35mm wide belt, all the power you make, and all the load you are carrying is being placed directly on that belt. the more load you put on it, the more heat you are creating in the belt. after a full top speed run at one set speed, your belt is sitting in one spot on the circumference of the clutch, creating a hot band in the clutch, which wont allow the belt to cool itself off under such high loads. if the owner varied his speeds every few seconds rather than just holding at one speed, he might have made it thru the day. but the sheer wide eyed wide open throttle happy riding style is going to leave him stranded in the bush more than just this once unless he calms down.

stock tires 26" < black mambas 29.5" which equates to 12% larger and about 240% heavier than stock creates alot of load on the machines belt. long hard top speed pulls generates so much heat in the belt, it fries it. you gotta understand how a belt is built to understand why it blew. there is glue that holds a belt together. once this glue gets to its peak operrating temperature, the glue melts, and the belt comes apart and explodes looking like you ran the belt thru a wood chipper.
 

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Adam! Great advice! Couldn't have said it better!Let us know what you findvthis weekend I want to modify the primary but no WCD. I talked to you at olds in Glamis for a while with the two black cats
 

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Bull. First, if someone wanted to putt around they would have not bought a Wildcat. And if wind resistance such as having a windshield is too much for a wildcat, then why does Arctic Cat sell them? (The windshield is crap too. I went on one ride and three of the plastic clamps are broke already) I broke a belt climbing a hill that Rzr's also climbed. The belt doubled over and was wedged against the case. There was no way to change it out in the field. The secondary had to come off because unlike the Cvt in a grizzly, the case is split with the back half only helping to pinch the belt. The case should have been designed so that when the cover was removed, the secondary would not be in the way to pinch it. Or it cold be designed with more clearance so as not to pinch the belt against the case. The primary weights will also fall out of their grooves, making it nearly impossible to put back without taking the primary off. You could have a bunch of people (if there are a bunch of people riding with you) tilt the wildcat while one or two people take screwdrivers and maneuver them back into position to let the plate draw back against them. The tie rods should have been put behind the wheel allowing for protection and also allowing the power steering motor to be mounted farther back. This would allow enough room to mount a winch where the power steering motor currently is located.The turn radius sucks. Period.The bottom end power is lacking. Not bad. But not good enough to hang with an XP.Bottom line is there are some design flaws on the Wildcat. Major design flaws on the cvt. And if riding style was to blame, then there would be RZR's out there with broken belts all the time. If Arctic Cat wants to compete with a RZR, then they HAVE to fix these design flaws. They can't just say we are being too hard on it. I was riding with RZR's and going the same speed and the same places. I was not doing anything out of the norm that a RZR rider was not doing with his machine.I like a lot of features of the Wildcat. But they have some work to do at the factory. And if they don't address these issues, then the Wildcat will be a story of failure in a few years, as soon as consumers get wise to these flaws.Either something is wrong with my Wildcat to burn that belt with 20 hours on it, or it was designed that way. And both scenarios are scary. If the secondary is lined up with the primary, then there is a design flaw and not a factory oversight. Either way Arctic Cat cost me $120 dollars on a new belt ( with only 20 hrs. of riding) and whatever the new clamps will cost me. I should probably write the windshield off all together and wait for an aftermarket company to come up with a better windshield. Then I have wasted another $330 on their poorly designed windshield. Personally, I think those clamps need more meat to them. Thicker and wider.
 

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Oh, and the Duro Kaden tires? I blew a sidewall out on a rock within the first hour of riding. (It has 26" moto mtc's on it now.) and no rock is going through those tires. I was very surprise at how thin those Duro Kaden tires were. They say they are 4 ply, but the thing is, there is no rating on ply's in the ATV/UTV tire industry. They were very thin. I just have to laugh at the notion of windshields, good tires and riding style being at fault for belt problems. Have you driven down a wet road without a windshield on a Wildcat? The water from the front tires is directed straight towards your face.I have 26x10 (front) and 26x12 (back) mud gear tires on my 09' Grizzly. I have done some work to it. Suspension and engine. I have been in some serious mud and gassed it hard. I have never had a problem with belts going bad. That is with a Monster Clutch Kit, tires that weigh a minimum of 14pounds per tire more than stock, an opened airbox, HMF exhaust, and Copperhead. Wildcats that have to be babied don't need a 951cc engine OR Walker Evans shocks.I waited 8-9 months for the Wildcat. I almost bought a XP a couple of times. But I held out. And have been thoroughly disappointed in the door handles, the tires, the windshield and the cvt. The tie rod has been bent and the radius arm has been bent. Why wouldn't Arctic Cat learn from RZR and go ahead and build a radius arm that goes up and then over and down, rather than a straight arm that RZR owners are buying aftermarket arms for?It just seems to me that these companies need to work on more than power and suspension. Those two things can be wow factors. But to make a successful product, they have many more issues to work on than that.
 

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FYI there are new clamps coming "FREE OF CHARGE" to those who purchased windshield. they had a problem with the clamps so they adreesed it and are making it right... as far as everything else goes i hate to hear your dissapointed with the cat. but there may be some thing's to think about when it comes to smoking a belt. i dont think the windshield is gonna play that much into it. im with you they wouldnt design it if it hurt it you would think. but bigger tires can def hurt the belt i have seen it time and time again. when running a big aggressive tire it is possible you need to have some clutch work done to help out.
 

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I can see what Adam is saying. A windshield alone is not enough to smoke a belt, but throw in some 28" tires that weigh 70 lbs, a windshield, do a few high speed passes at full throttle and now you've overheated the belt.

I've seen people brag about how long their belts lasted, and others complain about how fast they blew a belt. These things typically either blow from overheating or last a good long time depending on the conditions and driving style. More strain, more wind resistance = much greater chance of blowing a belt.
 

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tell your buddies:

"if you take a regular chevrolet or ford pickup, just your standard V8 truck, and put 37" mud tires on it and hold it to the floor, not a cruise around town, hold it to the floor, and see how long the tranny lasts. the loads from trying to pull a large heavy tire, overheats the tranny fluid in a truck, which leads to failure of the tranny. same concept in the ATV and UTVs. you put the machine under a huge load like pulling a set of 29.5" black mambas (which weigh 70lbs each) and then hold your machine to the floor and its going to cook the belt. the clutch was not slipping the belt, you just overheated it. the higher load you put on your machine, whether it be from huge tires, or tons of gear, or full windshields and top, these loads and wind resistance put more strain on your machine, the motor and driveline. since your motor is connected to the transmission by a 35mm wide belt, all the power you make, and all the load you are carrying is being placed directly on that belt. the more load you put on it, the more heat you are creating in the belt. after a full top speed run at one set speed, your belt is sitting in one spot on the circumference of the clutch, creating a hot band in the clutch, which wont allow the belt to cool itself off under such high loads. if the owner varied his speeds every few seconds rather than just holding at one speed, he might have made it thru the day. but the sheer wide eyed wide open throttle happy riding style is going to leave him stranded in the bush more than just this once unless he calms down.

stock tires 26" < black mambas 29.5" which equates to 12% larger and about 240% heavier than stock creates alot of load on the machines belt. long hard top speed pulls generates so much heat in the belt, it fries it. you gotta understand how a belt is built to understand why it blew. there is glue that holds a belt together. once this glue gets to its peak operrating temperature, the glue melts, and the belt comes apart and explodes looking like you ran the belt thru a wood chipper.
If you go over to the XP900 Forum, you will find that they were/are smoking belts left & right. They determined it is due to improper riding, improper belt break in & extreme mods.

Adam is right, belt failures are mainly caused by over heating the belt by being put under extreme loads for long durations and varying the load will help cool the belt down. Also you must remember that the belt is enclosed in a cover which restricts air flow. The wild cat was designed with certain load factors in mind, and going to extreme tire changes & increase weights will put a larger load than what it was originally designed to handle.

Also by not varying your load, you will eventually wear a grove into your clutch faces or even damage the clutch from excessive heat, which will then cause even more belt problems.

The three main reasons that a belt break are, Over heating, Damage, grove or stuck clutch faces, improper break in of a new belt (Yes, they do need to be broken in.

On my Honda Pilot, even with no cover, I would smoke a belt from time to time. And except for ounce where I had high restriction on the opening of my secondary, the belt failure were mainly caused by not properly break in the belt or because of riding style until I learned better.

Mike

And ounce you extremely over heat a belt just ounce, it is now compromised and even more prone to failure.
 

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Here is the Video where Arctic Cat tells how to break in a new belt. Althouh this is for snowmobile, it really applies to all belts, reguadless to the of type of machine or it's brand



Mike
 

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uk43228


i see that you are a little upset about your purchase, and more upset about my little spill on what burnt your belt. i guess you missed the whole part about the big tires being 200% heavier, coupled WITH the wind resistance created by a windshield. you apparently proof-read my statement and took it to heart that i blamed your windshield alone or something. high loads, and excessive strain will overheat a belt. you cant make a belt that will handle every stupid mistake an owner can potentially put the machine thru. a belt is rubber, the clutch is aluminum, the aluminum clutch squeezes the side of the belt trying to grab it which in itself creates friction, and heat. you throw a bunch of loads at the machine this friction increases creating more heat. over prolonged periods of high load, you will overheat and blow your belt.

again back on how superior a RZR is, wow so lame. a RZR clutch only has 3 weights in the primary, which means they only have the centrifugal force of those 3 weights clamping down on the primary clutch to grab a belt. in high load situations at slow speeds, a RZR is a belt slipping monster. you apparently aint rode a polaris in tight woods with big tires cause they are not the model for clutch setups. with big tires and high loads they chew a groove in the base of the primary within 500 miles that will leave the clutch basically junk. arctic cats dont slip belts, they have 8 roller weights clamping the clutch closed to the belt which creates a ton of centrifugal force and rarely ever, like next to never, slip a belt.
-- RZRs do have one advantage, and that is clutch diameter. their secondary clutch is a larger diameter than any other UTV on the market. what this does is allow polaris to run a longer belt, (which in turn will run cooler with greater length and surface area) and since the clutch is a larger diameter, the belt runs at a greater circumference in the clutch when at top speed, which also allows the clutches to run cooler. a normal polaris secondary will run the belt down to about a 6" diameter circumference, which leaves about 8" of belt surface area contacted with the secndary at top speed.
-- the arctic cat secondary, will push the belt down to about a 4.25" diameter circumference in the clutch which only leaves about 4.5-5" of belt surface area in contact with the secondayr. since there is so much less belt touching the clutch, meaning the belt is generating tons more friction wrapped at the base of the clutch. running for a high load, for a prolonged period, at top speed, generates more heat in the cat clutch which will melt the glue in the belt and allow the belt to come apart.

lemme say this, the cat is a wicked machine, and whatever you did to cook your belt, just back it down a notch or two and save the belt. you are not in the boat by yourself. head on over to the commander forums and read about belt problems, i can guarantee you that there are at least 2 open threads on the home page about belt problems, and these machines have been out almost 2 years and are still an awesome seller and EVERY single commander slips belts, their stock clutch IS DESIGNED TO SLIP BELTS UNDER LOADS in order to keep from grenading a diff or axles, which eats belts for breakfast. the cat has a spike load dampner in the rear end, but the can-am primary is designed to slip under loads. i have had owners with as little as 6 miles on a commander blowing their first belt. you gotta awesome machine believe me it could be worse
 
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