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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks for the suggestions on the engine hoist, but I live in Israel, where this is less accessible and more expensive (about 400$). I also don't have where to store it, even temporarily as I live in an apartment building.

I've decided to pull the cylinder off with the engine mounted.
It appears to be not as complicated as I originally thought.
So far I've pulled the valve cover, will get to the cylinder in the next couple of days.

Already found something interesting -
Lower left valve spring is broken and basically fell off. Found the broken metal pieces from its top sunk in the engine oil next to it.

252457
 

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Our slang is "you lost a valve".

That spring is simply relaxed - it is no longer attached to the end of the valve and in tension. That allowed the valve to slip down into the combustion chamber, where it got hit by the top of the piston, bent, and jammed into the spark plug. The impact between the piston and valve always ruins the valve and often ruins the piston. It can also damage the cylinder and the cylinder head, but each failure is different. The fact that you had coolant come out of the stator drain plug is not a good sign.

Unless you can do an engine overhaul in your apartment, the next step is to take it to a repair shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
The valve hitting the piston is exactly what I thought.
What makes you think a complete overhaul may be needed?

I was a bit more optimistic, I thought it will end up in replacing top end only, which looks doable when the engine is installed on the vehicle.
 

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Yes, you are correct about most likely being able to replace the rear cylinder top end in the chassis. I tend to look at it as an excuse to "reset" the entire engine to as-new condition.
 
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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
Had some time to take off the rear cylinder top end completely.
The entire top end is gone, piston is completely broken and the cylinder is cracked. Pictures below.

I really enjoyed the work, so I'd like to finish it by myself and not take it to the shop.

How can I inspect what needs to be replaced?
Obviously the entire rear top end - cylinder, piston, valves, gaskets.

Is there a way to inspect the bottom end?
Shall I also replace the front top end? (seems easily accessible with enough clearance). Got curious by some big core kits like this one.

Where should I buy the parts from (in the US, will ship them to Israel)?

Any advice on how to proceed will be appreciated!

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252467
 

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That sucks man. Personally I'd go through EVERYTHING in engine. Including replacing oil lines and either replacing or cleaning the cooler (most replace). You could start by removing the little strainer pan (that oil plug screws into) and inspecting, along with cutting open the oil filter just so you have an idea. ANY metal in there and I'd go through everything. I'm new to my X but certainly not engines or your breakdown. Good luck!
 

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I recently bought a 2014 Wildcat X with 250 hours on it.

Last weekend I took it for a short ride. All was well until the engine stuttered for couple of seconds and then drove well.
About one hour later I was riding a high speed trail. I slowed down and then the engine stuttered for couple of seconds, stalled and didn’t start since.

The solenoid clicks but the engine won’t crank.
Seems like the stater died. Connected a new battery and jumped the solenoid - nothing.
I removed the starter and connected it directly to a battery - nothing.
So I will order the new heavy duty starter kit.

But, what I don’t understand is if the problem is a bad starter, why the engine stuttered and stalled?
Maybe there’s some other issue I’m missing and even when I’ll replace the starter the problem will persist.

What do you think?
mine just did it 30 amp fuse fixed it fuse located under passenger seat
 

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A supplier in southern California usually has a listing on ebay for re-chromed oversized cylinders and forged piston assemblies (piston, rings, wrist pin). I bought from them approx 2 years ago. Message me if you can't find them and I'll dig through my stuff to identify them. Of course, they don't do any of the work. The pistons are from JE Pistons and the re-chromed cylinders are from Millenium Technologies. Namura makes a gasket set if you don't want or can't get OEM.

The advice from ARG is good if a bearing started coming apart. That sort of failure sends near-microscopic debris throughout the oil system. Ultrasonic cleaning is the only way to adequately clean an oil cooler in that situation, so it is often cheaper to replace. If you a certain your damage only resulted in larger pieces, you can clean up the crankcase, repair the broken parts and cross your fingers.

If you are inclined to be more thorough, you will have to split the engine case in order to get to the oil pump and inspect the crankshaft bearings. That can upset the clearances in the transmission parts (the engine and trans are one big assembly). In other words, it is a big job.
 

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If your gonna spend all that coin on a re-build, spend the little bit extra and replace the oil cooler.

In all 4 ( or 6?) of my engine failures over two cars, the Warranty rebuilds replaced the oil cooler AND flushed the lines.

C-ya!
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I will replace the oil cooler to a new one and clean the oil lines.
Thanks a lot for that advice.

Two follow up questions:
1. Is there any way to even roughly asses the condition on the bottom end without splitting the case open?
I will inspect the oil filter as mentioned above and will check if I can remove the pan with the engine installed, as mentioned above. If there are any other techniques I'd love to do follow them.

2. How can I inspect which valves need to be replaced? Obviously the broken one, but is there a way to check if the others are fine?

A supplier in southern California usually has a listing on ebay for re-chromed oversized cylinders and forged piston assemblies (piston, rings, wrist pin). I bought from them approx 2 years ago. Message me if you can't find them and I'll dig through my stuff to identify them. Of course, they don't do any of the work. The pistons are from JE Pistons and the re-chromed cylinders are from Millenium Technologies. Namura makes a gasket set if you don't want or can't get OEM.
Are you referring to BP Racing? I found a kit for Wildcat 1000 listed on eBay: Arctic Artic Cat Wildcat 1000 Big Bore Kit Cylinders 94 mil Top End Rebuild Set | eBay
They don't have anything listed for the X model. I'll send them a message.
 

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Yes, BP Racing. You can choose between (I think) 3 different compression ratios. CR is the only difference between non X and X as far as cylinders and pistons. There are differences in the cams, plus the X doesn't have any compression release.

Re: what valves need replacing - IMHO before you even look at the valves, you need to check the valve guide for the bent/broken valve. If the guide is damaged, you may well be better off finding a salvage cylinder head. It will come with valves. Put a good valve into the guide and see if you can push it sideways, particularly in the direction of the impact with the piston. You shouldn't be able to detect any movement. And if it is hard to push a good valve into the guide, the guide is bent.

Be aware that there are different cams in the front and rear cylinder heads, so if you also need a replacement cam, make sure you buy the correct cylinder head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I talked to BP Racing, they are saying their top end kit doesn't fit the X model.
Did you buy a kit for them for the X or the standard model?

Any other shop that sells top end kits that fit the X?
 

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I was buying for an X.

There is a difference in the cylinder p/n for a '12 and for an '18 X. Before checking, I was confident that the cylinders were interchangeable. Searching this forum, it seems that the compression ratio was raised by shortening the cylinder, and that X pistons can be used on all years. The head gasket is the same.

If all that is true, then the BP kit will work for you. As for BP Racing not having that knowledge, there aren't all that many Wildcats, so a vendor supporting the entire ATV and UTV community is unlikely to know about the fine details.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Maybe I'm mixing things up, but if the compression ratio on the X was raised by shortening the cylinder and I'm buying a big bore kit designed for the standard model, I will go up in displacement but go down in compression. So although the kit will fit, I won't necessarily gain as much engine output increase as I would with a big bore kit designed for the X.
Am I right?

BTW, the pistons on BP's kit are marked as 11.5:1.
 

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Yup, you have the cr thing figured out. I ran the numbers based on dropping my X motor to 9.5:1, IIRC. The two changes almost perfectly cancel out. I broke the motor in w/o the turbo and it was a little faster than when it was stock.

BP defaults to 11.5:1, as most people buying their kit are not installing a turbo, want the extra power the CR gives, but want to avoid running race gas (12.5:1 would almost certainly require race gas). The pistons are almost always made to order, so you will get to choose between 9.5, 10.5, 11.5 and 12.5 in the oversized bore size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Did some digging online, couldn't find a conclusive statement on Wildcat X stock compression ratio.
I did encountered several discussions with folks saying that X and regular model have different pistons. On top of that, BP are saying their kit doesn't fit the X. Although they said that I can return the kit if it doesn't fit, for me it's a hassle as I don't leave in the US.

I think I got three options I'm comfortable with:
  1. Buy a top end kit guaranteed to fit the X, is there a place that sells such a kit?
  2. Rebuild only the damaged cylinder with OEM parts.
  3. Replace the damaged cylinder and install two high compression pistons (such as this) to benefit from some performance improvement and renew the other cylinder. Unleaded fuel in Israel is available at 95 and 98 octane at every gas station.
WDYT?
 

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I started to say I would determine if the rear cylinder head was bad, and if it was I would upgrade the engine to X specs with the BP kit and a pair of salvage (ebay) X cylinder heads instead of replacing just the non-X rear cylinder head. However, when the X came out people started breaking the starter drive, and your machine would pretty much be in that 2013.5 or 2014 spec. You can minimize the problem by keeping the machine in perfect tune and upgrading the starter and starter drivetrain to the later spec.

Given all of that, if you have been happy with the performance, option 2 would be the conservative way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I think we're not on the same page here :) I own 2014 X model, not the standard one.

I was happy with the performance.
It's my first side by side, so I still have a long way to go until I'll want something with more power.
I was thinking of doing the both cylinder top ends mainly because everything is accessible at the moment.

The question is whether to go OEM (and then I'll only do the rear), or put a high compression pistons and do front + rear.
 

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Sorry, I got you confused with someone else.

Personally, I wouldn't go higher than the stock compression ratio given the number of early Xs that have broken the starter drive boss in the engine case. The engine case is currently unavailable, and no one knows if AC will ever have more. If by some chance your engine has been replaced with a '16 or newer, go with the high compression pistons, as your engine should have the upgrades to fix the starter problem.

If the high compression pistons you are looking at are from JE Pistons, you should note that the piston rings do not come pre-sized. The end gaps need to be set, which is a good thing as far as performance and longevity. However, when I installed my big bore kit I couldn't find a ring grinder to rent. This seems to be a lost art in the US, and I had to cobble together a setup using a Dremel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I couldn't find high compression pistons for the X.
There are several for the standard model (JE, Wiseco), but all explicitly state the pistons don't fit the X.

I also couldn't also find a big bore for the X.

So I'm left with OEM parts.
I'll re-build the rear cylinder, leave the front one intact, replace the oil cooler and install the heavy duty starter kit.
The upside is that it's the cheapest option.

Thanks a lot for all the great advices!

Any other suggestions before I order all the parts?
 
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