Wildcat Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,345 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There are a couple of videos on youtube linked by various threads here on the forum, along with some general and detailed discussions. All these are worthwhile and you may find a gem of information that helps in your specific case, so do take the time to read about other people’s experiences. So check out these links:

http://www.wildcatforums.net/forum/wildcat-general-discussion/2174-muzzy-wcd-kit.html

http://www.wildcatforums.net/forum/projects-how/2580-wildcat-clutch-removal-notes.html

http://www.wildcatforums.net/forum/wildcat-general-discussion/2916-muzzy-wcd-question.html

http://www.wildcatforums.net/forum/wildcat-general-discussion/2350-muzzys-wcd-arrived-today.html

http://www.wildcatforums.net/forum/muzzys/2542-muzzy-wcd-install-questions.html



  • Note that the Muzzy WCD kit no longer includes a replacement spring for the stock secondary clutch, so no need to do anything with that clutch, unless you want to clock it for more aggressive backshift. This How-to is long enough as it is, so that will have to be another topic.
Why install this WCD (Wet Clutch Delete)?
I would advise that you don’t. That you stay at home with your family and enjoy a nice rerun of Punky Brewster on TV. If you must go out and risk your life and dirty your laundry in a UTV, stick with what the manufacturers have sold you, at their lawyers insistence, and do not enhance its performance. Don't believe me? Check out the first 12 pages of your owners manual and tell me AC is not bound by lawyers... You will almost certainly be killed any such “improvement”. If you’ve got such a death wish, then nothing I can say will prevent the inevitable…

The stock wet clutch “behind” the primary drive clutch limits the power that “gets through” to the primary clutch. Actually, it limits the rate of transfer of the power, so when you mash the throttle to the floor from a standstill, you’ll note that the expected rate of acceleration in a stock Wildcat is somewhat less than exhilarating… Ok, it’s not entirely the wet clutch responsible for this as there are other factors such as the calibration of the primary and secondary clutch themselves, driveline efficiency, traction etc. But the wet clutch is the single biggest limiter in the stock Wildcat setup. This isn’t just felt at the starting line – it also comes into play throughout the RPM range to varying degrees. Ever tried to break the rear wheels loose in a turn by goosing the throttle? No, of course not, that would be suicide. But if you did attempt such a maneuver, you’re likely to find that contrary to what you expected you simply sped up slightly and probably pushed further outside on the turn instead of insanely swinging the back end around in a reckless, though artful, arc. No “instant” power. You’re boxing in molasses.

The WCD replaces the stock wet clutch with, well, solid parts. I’m not a mechanic or an engineer, so I won’t try to state what these parts are exactly. But now you’re pulling your red wagon with a steel cable instead of a bungee cord.

The Muzzy WCD kit also comes with a replacement primary clutch. Once which is not only calibrated more aggressively, but one which you can more easily tune, if you’re game to do so. I won’t be discussing this in this thread.


Parts needed:
The Muzzy Wet Clutch Delete kit comes with everything you need except some shop supplies:
Red Loctite
Blue Loctite
RTV Silicone
Axle grease (dab)


Tools needed:

  • Floor jack
  • 4”x6”x16” piece of wood, roughly
  • T-30 Torx socket and a ratchet handle
  • 4mm Hex socket
  • 10mm Hex socket
  • A short wobble extension is handy, as is a T-30 screwdriver
  • Medium Phillips screwdriver
  • 37mm or 1-7/16” medium deep socket, impact grade preferred
  • 32mm or 1-1/4” socket, impact grade preferred
  • 24mm or 15/16” socket, impact grade preferred
  • Short impact extension
  • Impact gun
  • 12mm and 17mm wrenches
  • Torque wrench
  • Torch (propane preferred - oxy-acetylene is a little much for what you need heat for)
  • Hammer (hard faced – not steel faced, dead blow is perfect)
  • Wire brush
  • Gasket scraper or small putty knife
  • Optional:
    Note that I’m not describing the method of clutch removal using these tools, nor the use of the blind bearing puller for the primary clutch outboard support bearing. But this is what you would need:
  • Long breaker bar for the three largest sockets
  • Clutch holder or large diameter strap wrench
  • Blind bearing puller
Procedure:

Outside Cover Removal

  1. Pull the airbox drain reservoir off the airbox.
  2. Remove the 2 straps on the cooling output (rear) duct either side of the rubber elbow and remove the rubber elbow.
  3. Remove the 2 straps on the cooling input (front) duct either side of the rubber elbow and remove the rubber elbow.
  4. Remove the two T-30 bolts securing the rear duct support to the clutch cover.
  5. Wiggle, waggle, twist push/pull, wear one red sock, touch your nose with your tongue – whatever it takes to pull the rear duct out, preferably in one piece. It’s not that bad, but it’s kinda weird.
  6. Remove two bolts securing the airbox to its support, then the three T-30 screws holding the support to the clutch cover.
  7. Remove the rest of the T-30 bolts from the front clutch cover. There should be sixteen altogether, including five long ones. No need to memorize which one comes from where – the five long ones are the ones that attach the airbox support and rear duct support to the cover.
  8. Give the cover a friendly rap with the screwdriver handle and it should be ready to remove. Mind you don’t lose the two short locating pins (hollow dowels) located one on either end of the cover.
  9. Carefully peel off the gasket and set it aside.
  10. Remove the two T-30 bolts securing the bearing retainer to the inside of the cover; remove the retainer and the spacer between it and the bearing.
  11. Put your block of 4x4 or 4x6 wood on the floor. Then, using the propane torch, gently heat the inside of the cover around the bearing. Keep the heat on the shoulder of bearing recess, going around and around but don’t directly heat the bearing itself. After about 90 seconds of this, grip the cover in both (gloved) hands, one on one long side of the cover and the other hand on the other long side, with the inside of the cover facing the floor, crouch down and firmly tap the cover onto the wood. Your hands should be on either side of the wood and the narrow sides of the clutch cover should hit the wood at the same time. It’s not slamming, it’s a forceful, pushing tap parallel with the wood face. You’ll do this several times, then heat again and repeat. Took me about 4 minutes total time, but each series of taps between heating’s showed a little more movement in the bearing. And there is little danger of mucking up the painted finish on the outside of the cover this way.
  12. You might consider jumping ahead to the section on the WCD installation, step #10 and install the new bearing while the cover is warm and very accepting...
  • [*=1]Optional method: Use Blind Bearing Puller

Primary Clutch Removal

  1. Chock the driver’s side front and rear wheels, then jack the passenger side of the Wildcat near the middle of the chassis until the passenger side wheels are just barely off the floor, rear shock fully unloaded.
  2. Remove the upper nut on the rear shock and wiggle the bolt out. Lay the shock backwards onto the upper suspension links.
  3. Squeeze drive belt with your left hand to keep the movable sheave from spinning and using the 32mm (or 1-1/4”) socket and an impact wrench in your right, hammer this nut off. It’s standard lefty-loosey. Your impact won’t do it? Get a decent one. Mine is a $49 electric piece of crap and it worked the nut loose in 10 seconds, so yours isn’t worth owning. Give it to someone you dislike. Worst case, you can heat the nut with a torch – 90 seconds with a propane torch won’t hurt anything “behind” the nut.
  4. Slide the movable sheave, tubular spacer and fixed sheave off of the shaft.
  • Optional method: Use clutch holder/strap wrench and socket/breaker bar
Secondary Clutch Removal

  1. Grip the drive belt in your right hand, trapping the clutch from turning easily, and zap the nut off using the impact gun and the 37mm (or 1-7/16”) socket.
  2. Slide the clutch off the shaft. There are likely either one or two washers behind the clutch you’ll want to slide off also.
  • Optional method: Use clutch holder/strap wrench and socket/breaker bar

Wet Clutch Removal

  1. Remove the nine T-30 bolts securing the inner clutch cover.
  2. Steadily apply increasing pressure separating the inner clutch cover from its mount points by pulling from the rear end of it. You’re working against a bead of silicone the factory put on the backside of the cover, so tapping or hammering won’t be effective and trying to pull it straight off likely won’t work. Just “peel” it off from one end. Find the two locating dowels and set them aside.
  3. Using a gasket scraper or a small putty knife and wire brush, remove the silicone remnants from the back of the inner clutch cover and from the mounting point on the engine.
  4. You’ve still got the vehicle jacked up, right? As long as there is some lean to it, you won’t lose more than a couple drops of oil in this step: Remove the five T-30 bolts from the wet clutch cover and remove the cover, which comes with the clutch housing/shaft. Do this carefully and hopefully the gasket will peel off nicely and be re-usable. Locate the two small locating dowels and set them aside (you should have six of these now).
  5. Using your trusty impact and a 24mm (15/16”) socket, zap the wet clutch retaining nut off.
    NOTE: THIS IS REVERSE THREAD – SO, LEFTY-NOT-SO-LOOSEY. PUT YOUR IMPACT ON FORWARD TO REMOVE THIS NUT. The clutch plates should slide right off as a single unit.
    • At this point, consider performing the first few steps of the Muzzy WCD install instead of completing the removal of the wet clutch housing/shaft. Then, when you’re ready to put the wet clutch cover back on it will be nice and warm, making it easier to slide into place.
  6. Get your gloves, propane torch and block of wood. Heat the backside of the wet clutch cover around the shoulder and webbing surrounding the shaft. Just heat the cover itself, not the shaft or the shaped spacer. It’ll take a couple minutes of heat, then, holding the assembly in both hands, shaft pointing down, drive it onto your block of wood several times, hard. The first thing to come sliding off will be that shaped (cupped) spacer. You’ll have to repeat this heating, banging several times but the shaft and clutch housing will eventually be driven out of the bearing in the cover. You could also support the cover and use your dead-blow hammer to assist this process, but there is little cover edge to support this, so don’t go all Tennessee on it, otherwise you risk breaking the cover. The amount you're going to heat the cover will not risk the paint on the outside of the cover.

Install the Muzzy WCD/Re-Assembly

  1. The Muzzy instructions are pretty good – it’s just the above prep work that is not covered. So I won’t duplicate what they have provided with the kit.
  2. After cleaning away any dried Loctite from the threads on the end of the crankshaft, slide the WCD mounting plate on the splines and secure with the original wet clutch retaining nut using a dab of red Loctite and either torquing to 165 ft-lbs or slamming home with your impact. Torquing is the correct choice, so naturally I just banged it on with my impact. REMEMBER, THIS IS REVERSE THREAD, SO PUT YOUR IMPACT ON REVERSE TO TIGHTEN THIS NUT.
  3. Making sure the mounting plate and it’s mating hub plate faces are clean, attach the hub plate to the mounting plate using the supplied screws and a dab of red Loctite on each. Snug these up with your 4mm hex socket and give an eighth of a turn more, as they are just aluminum.
  4. You took my advice earlier and still have a nice warm wet clutch cover, right? Smear a dab of axle grease around the hub plate. Then make sure the cover’s gasket face is clean, as well as the mating face on the engine block, put the two locating pins in place in the cover and carefully slide the cover over the WCD hub, keeping it nice and parallel with the engine block. It should slide right on and hopefully you haven’t dropped a locating dowel. Bolt it on with the five T-30 bolts, snugged up nice.
  5. Fuss with the kits replacement spacer/o-ring/alignment pin as described in the Muzzy instructions. Not difficult, but if you can’t put it together without dropping the pin several times you didn’t get enough practice with “Operation” as a kid… Your significant other’s favorite tweezers might be handy.
  6. Put a bead of RTV silicone on the back of the rear clutch cover around the mating faces and re-install the rear cover using its nine T-30 bolts, remembering to use the two locating dowels (you should now have two left).
  7. Slide the new Trailbloc primary clutch onto the WCD hub and secure with the Muzzy supplied hex head bolt (10mm), making sure to use the centering washing which was in the box with the Trailbloc clutch. THE NEW BOLT IS REVERSE THREADS. Hand tighten, then torque to 80 ft-lbs. This is a little tricky, fiddling with strap wrench. Instead, I put a big adjustable wrench on the larger nut head on the end of the clutch to hold it while I torqued the retaining bolt. That may not be the right thing to do, but I watched it carefully as I torqued the securing bolt and the larger one didn't slip on the clutch at all.
  8. Clean any residual Loctite off the transmission shaft threads, slide the secondary clutch washer(s) onto the transmission shaft, then put the drive belt around the primary clutch.
  9. Take one of the long T-30 bolts from the outer clutch cover and thread it into the face of the secondary clutch (only one of the holes is threaded), until the clutch sheaves are fully apart. Fit the clutch "into" the drive belt and tighten the belt with your free hand while angling the secondary clutch over to the transmission shaft. It's a bit of a stretch and slightly awkward, but you'll get 'er back in place. Remove the T-30 bolt and spin the belt around a bit until the sheaves are roughly closed and the belt isn't twisted or pinched.
  10. Secure the secondary clutch with a drop of red Loctite and the nut torqued to 165 ft-lbs, or bloody tight with the impact gun. No need to go overboard though, someday you may want to take this off again with the same impact. With that red Loctite in place, you don’t want to go to the limits of the impact when tightening.
  11. Install the new outboard support bearing from the kit in the outer clutch cover. If you're doing this right after removing the old one, the cover should be nice and warm, ready to accept this bearing. Lay the cover on your piece of wood face down and prop up the one end so it's roughly level. Place the bearing and using a square block of wood or an appropriate size deep socket, tap it home with your dead-blow hammer. Install the Muzzy-supplied spacer on top of the bearing and bolt the bearing retainer back into the cover using a little blue Loctite on the two T-30 bolts. Snug is just fine.
  12. Re-install the outer clutch cover with its gasket, two locating dowels, and 11 shorter T-30 bolts, then bolt the airbox support back on with it's three T-30 bolts. Ram the rear duct back into place and bolt its support through the cover using the remaining two long T-30 bolts.
  13. Re-assemble the rubber ducting elbows, secure them with clamps, and secure the airbox with its two bolts.
  14. Swing the rear shock back up into place and wiggle the bolt back through the mount. You may have to muscle a little compression on the shock and tap the bolt in place with your dead-blow hammer. Then secure it with the locknut.
  15. Lower the jack and stow the wheel chocks.
  16. Give ‘er.
Actually, with the new primary being a compression fit, I just drove around a little bit blipping the joy pedal a few times and stayed close to home. I plan on taking the cover off again and re-torquing the primary bolt again to 80 ft-lbs. But that's me.

RLW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Thanks. How about a "How-to: replace a CV Boot?" I seen some posts in a few places but would be nice to have a step by step and maybe some video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
In the process of installing my wcd now. I literally just got done removing the stock secondary spring. I have access to a hydraulic press at work that made pretty quick work of it. But now you're telling me the new wcd kits don't require changing out this spring? Why so?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,345 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
In the process of installing my wcd now. I literally just got done removing the stock secondary spring. I have access to a hydraulic press at work that made pretty quick work of it. But now you're telling me the new wcd kits don't require changing out this spring? Why so?
Presumably you would have looked in the box before you started ripping and tearing... didn't you note there was no spring? I'm only stating what I was told on the phone by someone at Muzzy, that they no longer include a replacement secondary spring. And indeed when my kit arrived the other day there wasn't one in the box. As for why, this is something you would have to direct to the good folks at Muzzy.

RLW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
No. mine came with the new spring. I ordered it a month ago. I'm just wondering if they made changes to the primary that make that new sporting not necessary. Oh well, I have the spring - might as well put it in...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
Muzzy installed my spring and set it up to my driving conditions before it shipped, spring is installed
Did Muzzy ship you a new secondary or did you ship your stock one to them so they could change the spring?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
No. mine came with the new spring. I ordered it a month ago. I'm just wondering if they made changes to the primary that make that new spring not necessary. Oh well, I have the spring - might as well put it in...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I never received a spring when i caled muzzy, Dave said it was installed in my primary? I live in central texas and will only be doing hard surface riding. I will call them tomorrow and double check, no big red spring in my package.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,695 Posts
I never received a spring when i caled muzzy, Dave said it was installed in my primary? I live in central texas and will only be doing hard surface riding. I will call them tomorrow and double check, no big red spring in my package.
. did he quiz you and ask you what your riding style was, what type of riding you would do? each kit is sent out with your riding styles intergrated into each kit, at least thats what the way i understood it.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top