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Looks good!
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Initial testing results:

The 77 long travel ride is one step closer to Joe Schmo offroad nirvana. I can't afford a trophy truck and a crew to run the Baja with, but this is in my wheelhouse. It is smooth and planted over everything except hard close together small ruts- the 64 is better here (using Fox with Shock Therapy Springs for both versions). The 2nd gen Ford Raptor doesn't like small chatter either, so it is in good company. The turning radius is wider, but the rear end pushes out into the turn naturally and shortens the corner up (the extra power helps with this). I ran the same small course track that I ran when it was 64 inches and didn't feel like I lost anything to the wider stance, but you can push the 77 harder. This will always be a nimble vs planted preference for the discerning driver. You will not believe the ride in the woops, slow or fast - a disney ride. People that have driven this agree that the long travel kit is a must have upgrade over anything else, even before more power. This of course only applies to those wanting a wider stance and less money in their pocket.

The clutch is working pretty sweet after the primary spring update, which Robby Gordon recommended (so credits to Robby- venom primary). I put an IR sensor on the belt and it never went above 170. There was a post on the XX forum some months back about 2 South American PUSH builds that were killing belts. I don't think they ever posted a resolution, but I'm glad that doesn't appear to be an issue here. Those were higher boosted rigs too, I believe.

The boost kicks in about a pound prior to 6 K and jumps to 6 K quick- it tops out at around 6 pounds. This may not seem like a lot of boost, but you never feel like you are waiting for it. I'm still running 11.5 to 1 stock compression. I don't really care how much extra power it is producing with boost. I just know that it is enough for my purposes. The tune is a Speed Tune with a fuel map update and no timing changes. It ran pretty good before the boost, so boost is icing on the cake.

There is almost no cab heat after the update. I can feel a little heat in the center console next to my right leg after brisk driving. The front radiator only serves the intercooler now.

The highest intercooler air temp I have seen is 129 degrees, with an outside temp close to 70. Normally the intercooler air temp runs between 80 and 108. I never paid attention to the stock air intake temps- what do you guys get on average? FYI: You have to push and hold the same dash button after selecting "air intake temp", if you want a digital readout.

My water and oil temps stay just off of normal minimums, with water 180-200 and oil 180-190. The fans are off most of the time, but it is cool out too.

The shocks need tuning, but I'm happy with what I have so far.

I'll post more, when I have more to report.
 

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What a great car. I saw you yesterday at the stoplight at hwy. 9 and sand hollow road. Would have stopped and introduced myself but I was in the big truck. Next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Yes. That was me. I was on my way to top the tank off. There was a large truck next to me in the left turn lane- that must have been you. I went out and smashed my front bumper the same day. Breaking things is part of the game. You can always PM me? I'm in the Dixie area, next to Hollow.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Hook, is the center fan for oil cooling?
Yes. You could say it is a double duty fan, except it only turns on above 180 degree F oil temps. There is also a check valve that won't open under 180, so the oil reaches operating temps.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
251017
I smashed my front bumper, so I had to replace it. I went with this Bad Dog bumper and I'm pretty happy with its clean look. It has a solid mount, protects under the nose & lights. It also won't get in the way of the winch.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Now that I've had time to fully test my long travel kit and turbo, I'd like to say it was a complete success. I would like to do a little more with my shocks, but it runs pretty flawless. I haven't put it on a dyno, but I'm pretty sure it has about 150 rear wheel horsepower and my torque is double what it was. I was never interested in a speed burner and just wanted grunt power when I needed it. I'm never wondering whether I'll have enough power anymore. There is zero turbo lag. I also love hitting a massive rut and bracing for the hit only for it to be nothing burger. I have hit things I'm sure will end bad and only end up with a smile on my face. It isn't a rock crawler as it is set up, but I feel comfortable doing some of it. But I'm not a rock crawler anyway, since I'm too risk adverse with the crazy stuff.

I like going fast and hitting new trails. This rig does all of this in a pretty comfortable way. You also end up in dicey situations on trails you have never been on and it nice to know that you have few limits, other than being too wide.

I spent too much money on this rig, but a least I'm not disappointed.

My intake temps average about 80 degress and my oil and water stay at about 190. And the big bonus is that there is no heat in the cab. I run my kevlar 8 ply 32" tires at 8 psi front and 9 psi rear.

The rig isn't perfect, but I'm having fun.
 

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Having fun is all that matters!
 

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Congrats, sounds like you did it right and many here probably have followed your install. If only AC would have rolled this SXS out with even 170 hp it would probably have taken alot of the sales away from the leader CanAM X3. Keep us posted on how the everything holds up as nobody else really posts on here who have a Push Turbo set up.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
That is the question. I wonder myself how it will hold up. I put a lot of effort into putting this package together. I wanted to keep the 11.5 compression, but I had to make sure I had good consistent intake, oil and water temps. I'm over the edge of the compression envelope under top boost loads. I didn't do the engine kit and this is where the risk starts. I could have a rod, piston or head bolt issue. But so far, I haven't even had a hint of knock, with pump gas. Hot summer weather will push the temps, so time will tell.

I also wonder how the Push turbo will hold up. I'm almost always under boost with this setup. So the turbo does get a work out. It is about 13.5 psi base here and I'm boosting about 14.5 at cruising rpm's. So it is easy to see why this is a zero lag setup.

If I make it through our hot ass summer, I'd have to say it was a success.
 

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I think I'm running into a kPa to PSI conversion problem with what you just posted about base and cruise PSI. When people talk about boost in PSI, sea level is zero. When using kPa, sea level is 100, so to talk turbo boost in the way that most people are accustomed to, you subtract 100 and then convert to PSI, and you are still in vac at cruise rpm, not boost. I suspect you are seeing about 93 kPa at idle and about 99 kPa at cruise. Both readings would convert to vacuum on a standard boost gauge, and both numbers are more or less normal for the average turbo setup.

Any turbo motor running a CVT feels like it has almost no lag. The CVT allows the engine to gain a lot of revs as soon as you tip in the throttle and the turbo starts making boost very quickly. My X felt like that with the MCX setup. A turbo motor with a standard trans has to accelerate the vehicle to gain revs and the time to boost is much longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I'm just going off what the wide band sensor tells me. It corrects for altitude and shows the current pre boost pressure as 13.5 approximately, at about 3000 feet in altitude. So if I want to know the boost I'm getting out of the turbo at the intake, 13.5 represents zero and I subtract this from anything above 13.5. I also know that sea level is 14.7, which is the true zero point that everything is referenced from. This really only impacts my total compression pressure as I have a lower start point. So my target boost is always a number subtracted by 14.7. When I say I'm at boost at cruising speeds, I'm just stating that my wide band is reporting extra output from my turbo at the intake. This doesn't refer to the true zero point of pressure at sea level. I'm just saying that it is spooled up and creating pressure and heat. The heat is also measured at the intake, which you also see ramping up.

I'm not an expert in all things boost, but I agree that the CVT does as you say (they spool quick), providing a proper turbo, intercooler and ducting is used.
My reference to zero lag was confusing, because I am aware of how a CVT impacts rpm's and spool time. I was just saying that this setup spools at lower RPM's, so you will wait a fraction of a second less than other setups while at cruise. I believe that isn't the goal with high boost rigs because of the torque developed and stress on the drive train. Plus constant boost creates extra intake heat and potential heat soak.

So I agree with what you are saying in every way, except that the goal post is moved at my altitude. I was just imperfectly describing turbo output at cruise . Without any boost, I'm at 13.5 and a lower intake temperature, until boost kicks in. I could be be confusing people though, with the way I described it.
 

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Yes, the way you are describing it is unusual. When you write that you are at 14.5 psi, most people will think you should be making about 220 hp at the crank at that moment. In "conversational boost terms", you're at 1 psi. My MCX equipped X was typically at ambient or in slight vac when cruising at any sane speed. Feathering the throttle to stay off the rev limiter when topped out running down the highway kept it at about 1.5 psi.

Another point for people to keep in mind as they read about different turbo setups is that all boost psi is not equal. In large part, the psi you see with a turbo system is determined by the restriction of the exhaust turbine. So a big turbo on the same engine making the same power will show a lower psi than a small turbo on that engine making the same power. I took my turbo Miata to a dyno day and made the same power, down to a tenth of a hp, at 14 psi as another guy did at 8. I had the tiny OEM IHI setup and he had good sized aftermarket Garrett.

You've got a neat setup, and like JBL, I hope you keep us informed as far as driveability and durability. With that long trek to and from the radiator-turned-intercooler I would have anticipated a tiny but noticeable delay between WOT and seeing meaningful boost.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I'm always trying to learn more about turbo tech. The small turbo vs large turbo dyno results had me wondering how. So I looked into it. I was under the impression that boost is boost, as long as the altitude and temperature is the same. I know there can be sensor placement issues, back pressure, airflow restrictions, timing and fuel mapping differences. I would have thought, if all else is equal, that an equivalent sensor based pressure would produce the same results, regardless of the size of the turbo. Of course, I would be wrong. You are correct. The difference is in the air volume that the larger turbo produces, which isn't accounted for simply as a measurement of PSI.
 

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Sweet build!!!!

I’ve ridden in/drove CRAWLRS Speedcat and it’s a hellava machine...
With a turbo even more so I would imagine!
If this setup was Factory with support/warranty for a price near/at/slightly above market for a long travel turbo car, Textron couldn’t build enough IMHO.
I know I would own one!
Enjoy the ride!

C-ya!
 

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Discussion Starter #39
BTW mbrandt1402, the setup on the intercooler is water cooled and not air cooled. Water routes from the intake adjacent intercooler to the front radiator and back. So there is little delay introduced because the air is cooled just prior to the intake. Of course all intercoolers create some restriction.
 

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Sorry - I didn't go back and re-read your thread before making that comment. I thought I saw that you were using the OEM radiator as the intercooler, not as the heat exchanger for the intercooler. My bad.
 
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