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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if the Wildcat uses "Plunging axles"?
At the Elk River test ride and I tried moving the axle (longitudinally) and it had no movement at all. Anyone know.
 

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WildOffRoad, What are plunging axles? I am going to say that I think they are going to use an axle just like a RZR. Uses a snap ring to keep them in the diff.

Ok never mind I got it. From when I looked at them I would say yes they are plunging axles. But I can't say 100% for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Plunging axles have a spline on each end that allows the axle to move back and forth in the CV. With the style of suspension on the Wildcat I'm guessing that it's not.
 

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Ok what would you guess they are going to use? From what I read on the internet it would seem like it would be the only way they could setup the axles. Please educate me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok what would you guess they are going to use?
I have no idea, I'm as new as a newbie can be with utv's:D

From what I read on the internet it would seem like it would be the only way they could setup the axles. Please educate me.
On vehicles with conventional trailing arms the axle needs to be able to move in and out (float) within the CV. With the Wildcat having more of an a-arm style rear suspension they may not need to float.
 

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I am just as much a newbie as you so I am here trying to learn all I can. I hope someone who is in the know will get on here and tell us.

I am a solid axle guy when it comes to Jeep and stuff. That is where my KNOW is at.
 

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I dont know but would there be some advantage/disadvantage?
 

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the new axles are double plunging meaning they plunge at both inner and outer ends of the axle bar. this axle will handle greater angles than any axle on the market, and the double plunging ends ensures the axles wont bind in the super long travel. the new double plunging axles arctic cat designed can be differentiated because of the noticable white inner cups. the only difference in the wildcat axle and the one pictured below is the bar length. same inner and outer cups, just longer bars.



follow this link, it shows picture comparisons of the new double plunging axles compared to a stock arctic cat axle.

Tonka Update and MP 1000 axles *comparision pics*





now watch this video, it shows you how the axle is, mounts, and is removed. you can see both ends plunging in and out when he is removing the axles.

2011-04-25_19-02-40_279.mp4 video by sixohh - Photobucket
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
the new axles are double plunging meaning they plunge at both inner and outer ends of the axle bar. this axle will handle greater angles than any axle on the market, and the double plunging ends ensures the axles wont bind in the super long travel. the new double plunging axles arctic cat designed can be differentiated because of the noticable white inner cups. the only difference in the wildcat axle and the one pictured below is the bar length. same inner and outer cups, just longer bars.



follow this link, it shows picture comparisons of the new double plunging axles compared to a stock arctic cat axle.

Tonka Update and MP 1000 axles *comparision pics*





now watch this video, it shows you how the axle is, mounts, and is removed. you can see both ends plunging in and out when he is removing the axles.

2011-04-25_19-02-40_279.mp4 video by sixohh - Photobucket
You can't see it but I'm grinning from ear to ear!!!:D

Thanks AIRDAM....
 

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Ok what would you guess they are going to use? From what I read on the internet it would seem like it would be the only way they could setup the axles. Please educate me.

Actually, plunging and non-plunging refers to the style of CV joint. A trailing arm style suspension setup changes distance between hub and drive flange as the suspension cycles through it's arc. When the axle is horizontal, it is at it's closest point to the drive flange. As it cycles up or down from there, the distance gets greater, requiring a CV joint designed to plunge in and out to allow for this. The axles have longer splines on them, but under load these splines will not slide and rely on the plunging design of the CVs to allow for suspension movement. When the vehicle is at rest, you can grab the axles and they will slide in/out on the splines and CVs.

An A-arm or 5 link style suspension (like the WC has) moves in an arc that is centered at the drive flange, so there is no change in distance through the suspension travel and they can use non plunging CVs and axles to transfer power. There are still splines on the axles, but they are much shorter and you may or may not be able to move them at rest, depending on how tight it's setup.

The advantage goes to non plunging CVs, since they can have much higher angles under power than plunging CVs due to design constraints. Most 930 CVs for example (plunging) have to be "race prepped" (loosened up with either a grinder or smaller CV balls) to achieve about 26-27* of max angle, which decreases significantly under load. Meaning if the CV were perfectly straight, it could handle tons of power, perhaps 1,000 hp, with no problems. However, the closer you get to max. angle under load, the power handling capabilities drop dramatically.

Non plunging CVs are quite often stated as having 40* or more of angle, so you can see how this would be critical if one were trying to build 18" of travel into something as narrow as 64". AC started off with the optimal suspension to allow them to use the correct CVs to get the desired amount of travel.

On heavier cars (not trucks), trailing arms are the preferred suspension for strength, especially in off-camber landings. In something this lightweight, AC made the trailing links beefy enough to easily handle the loads, but used the 5 link for the extreme travel in such a narrow track width.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Your spot on in your post socaldmax!!! Good write up. The reason for the original post was to determine what our options may be when it came to modifying our trailing (actually "A" arm) suspension on a Wildcat.
 

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I thought a trailing arm is a link with a shock mounted on it? Thus meanind the wildcat has them. That's what there called in the ultra 4 and trophy truck world.
 

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The wildcat has two trailing arms(upper, and the lower with the shock mounted to it) but it is not a true trailing arm suspension setup or, as previously mentioned, would require plunging CV's. It's also not a true A-arm suspension - the front suspension is. They call it a 5-link suspension for a reason - cuz that's what it is.
 

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I did a little research after I posted. Makes since, I've built several suspensions that all centered around solid axles, so the lingo is a little different. So the cv's have no plunge? I figured all cv's have a little plunge built in. I'm not doubting, just trying to learn.Thanks
 

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Ok total UTV and 4x4 newbie here, after racing off road bikes in the desert for 20 years I have now moved to UTV's, would anyone mind telling me the names for the Wildcat suspension arms etc front and rear, trying to learn the various bits but confused with the teminology :(
 

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Ok total UTV and 4x4 newbie here, after racing off road bikes in the desert for 20 years I have now moved to UTV's, would anyone mind telling me the names for the Wildcat suspension arms etc front and rear, trying to learn the various bits but confused with the teminology :(
First things first contrary to what some above said the axles are double plunging.

Now lets cover some suspension parts:

Up front you have upper and lower A-arms.

In the rear you have the really large tube on the bottom that runs from the bottom of the frame behind the seats to the rear wheel knuckle, that is the lower trailing arm. There is a sway bar link up closer to the frame end of the lower trailing arm.

The smaller one that runs above it along the same pathway from behind the seats to the rear wheel knuckle, that is the upper trailing arm.

There are two rods that run from the very rear of the frame to the top of the rear wheel knuckle, arctic Cat simply calls those "upper suspension links" but the rest of the world calls them the upper radius rods.

Finally there is one rod that runs from the very rear of the frame to the bottom of the rear wheel knuckle, again Arctic Cat calls it a "lower suspension link" but to the rest of the world it is a lower radius rod.

:cool:
 

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First things first contrary to what some above said the axles are double plunging.

Now lets cover some suspension parts:

Up front you have upper and lower A-arms.

In the rear you have the really large tube on the bottom that runs from the bottom of the frame behind the seats to the rear wheel knuckle, that is the lower trailing arm. There is a sway bar link up closer to the frame end of the lower trailing arm.

The smaller one that runs above it along the same pathway from behind the seats to the rear wheel knuckle, that is the upper trailing arm.

There are two rods that run from the very rear of the frame to the top of the rear wheel knuckle, arctic Cat simply calls those "upper suspension links" but the rest of the world calls them the upper radius rods.

Finally there is one rod that runs from the very rear of the frame to the bottom of the rear wheel knuckle, again Arctic Cat calls it a "lower suspension link" but to the rest of the world it is a lower radius rod.

:cool:
So the guys above are wrong and they ARE plunging axles??
 
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