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no, it was like that, so i got on the internet looking at pics and i am seeing most of all them are like this, dont look right to me, but even the videos from arctic cat the springs are like that
 

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This has been hashed to death on here with diffrent opinions. In my opinion they are suppose to be that way and keep pressure on the main spring when your jumping or when all the tension is off the spring. Jack it up off the ground and im pretty sure they will open up.
 
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They do open up. Land vehicle Vehicle Tire Automotive tire All-terrain vehicle
 

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This has been hashed to death on here with diffrent opinions. In my opinion they are suppose to be that way and keep pressure on the main spring when your jumping or when all the tension is off the spring. Jack it up off the ground and im pretty sure they will open up.
Exactly!
 

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Same Here Mines Like That To
 

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I saw an offroad truck yesterday, and the spring setup, while being different, had the same component for droop set in the springs. If the top spring looked like the bottom spring, when you jump there would be slack between your spring and the stop. By having the top spring compressed, it takes up that slack. The way the guy explained it to me is that at ride position your suspension is about in the middle of its travel. Because of that you are going to have a spring compressed somewhere, otherwise you wouldn't get your droop when going through deep whoops and over jumps. And he said that is just as important to a good ride as your upward travel. He said a bunch of technical stuff too, but this is how he explained it when I said I had no idea what he was talking about!!
 

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I have a triple spring setup on my snowmachine and that is exactly the way it looks. The one light weight spring is used to take up the slack when extended.

You do need to check to ensure it does open up when the suspension extends. If not loosen it up. The best way I can describe proper adjustment would be to jack it up so that the tires are off the ground, loosen the adjustment till you can about rattle the spring around then tighten back up about two to three turns. Many times folks used the adjustment to raise the ride height and take out the usefulness of that spring.

I run HyGear Suspension setup on my sleds and the triple springs are amazing. Just for an idea of what springs are in my sled one spring is a 500 lb/in, the second is 100 lb/in and the third main spring is 11 inches and rated at 200 lb/in. With this setup I have about 15 inches of travel up front. Obiviously the 100 lb/in spring is only there for one reason and the 500 lb/in spring is there probably to help keep the hard bottom out from happening.
 

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I saw an offroad truck yesterday, and the spring setup, while being different, had the same component for droop set in the springs. If the top spring looked like the bottom spring, when you jump there would be slack between your spring and the stop. By having the top spring compressed, it takes up that slack. The way the guy explained it to me is that at ride position your suspension is about in the middle of its travel. Because of that you are going to have a spring compressed somewhere, otherwise you wouldn't get your droop when going through deep whoops and over jumps. And he said that is just as important to a good ride as your upward travel. He said a bunch of technical stuff too, but this is how he explained it when I said I had no idea what he was talking about!!

Suspension setups are like opinions, everyone has a different one.

He is correct, most off road cars are setup with 40% droop. Meaning at rest, the vehicle sags 40%. If it had 26" of travel, you would have to jack it up 10.4" before the tire even left the ground. Most sandrails are setup with 25% droop, meaning if it has 20" of travel, it sags 5" just sitting there.

The calculations for dual spring rates is S1xS2/S1+S2. Even among builders of the same style of rail, there is an "old school" and "new school" philosophy. Old school guys would set it up with say 150/150 spring rates. New school guys would setup the same rig with something like 100/250. This would give a slightly softer ride at normal ride height, but when you hit the crossover, the secondary rate would jump up drastically and prevent bottoming.

It can all be calculated mathematically, and is best determined by the terrain and style of driving of the owner, in addition to his preference for body roll and soft ride.
 
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