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When you change from B-1 to A-1 how much does it lower the rpms? On sleds changing the position of the secondary spring was almost a 200 rpm change at WOT. Increase in torsional pressure holds in "in gear" longer and will help back shift.

If thats the secondary off the Wildcat that thing from just looking at your video has a bunch of room for improvement. Adam is going to be doing a bunch of these clutches once people run them for awhile, I see a stage 5 in my future.

I am really surprised no one has come up with a system like they use on sleds to adjust belt tension/deflection or to be able do an easy trailside secondary spring adjustment/belt change.
 

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Info Adam posted on one of my clutch threads on a prowler forum.

Sure you guys will need this info soon enough:D

Info.. From Airdam post in one of my thread's




with the helix facing upwards, you turn the top movable sheave clockwise, tightening the spring up giving the spring a pre-load to snap the clutch closed.

the A,B,C settings are incremental in 1,2,3,4 hole positions on the helix itself. meaning if you leave the spring in the

B position and put it in the

#1 hole you twist the sheave 16 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#2 hole you twist the sheave 38 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#3 hole you twist the sheave 70 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#4 hole you twist the sheave 92 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe


A position and put it in the

#1 hole you twist the sheave 25 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#2 hole you twist the sheave 58 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#3 hole you twist the sheave 88 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#4 hole you twist the sheave 106 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe (almost impossible to get it around to line up spring is too stiff)


C position and put it in the

#1 hole you twist the sheave 34 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#2 hole you twist the sheave 69 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#3 hole you twist the sheave 93 degrees to line the helix up with the shoe
#4 hole you twist the sheave 120+ degrees to line the helix up with the shoe (couldn't get it around there so i am only guessing)


so every time you go up a hole, you are adding more twist to the spring, increasing the spring rate which gives you a faster and snappier backshift. i wish i had a spring load device that would allow me to clock the spring giving it more twist and compress it at the same time to see the increase in spring rate but i do not have that ability. for anyone who has dealt with their own clutch you will know that B-4 is SUPER hard to twist the sheave around and get lined up to, because it is super hard to reach. you can see by the degree of twist on the spring, you can calculate what rate would give you the correct spring tension you want. obviously B-1 is the softest setting you can have, and they go up from there. i'll try and make a list of the softest setting to the stiffest setting for you guys just curious.


B-1 -- 16 degrees
A-1 -- 25 degrees
C-1 -- 34 degrees
B-2 -- 38 degrees
A-2 -- 58 degrees
C-2 -- 69 degrees
B-3 -- 70 degrees
A-3 -- 88 degrees
B-4 -- 92 degrees
C-3 -- 93 degrees
A-4 -- 106 degrees
C-4 -- 120+ degrees
 

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tighter she spring more rpm slower shift
Understand that part but how much change....for example if I go from running the beach at sea level set in B-1 getting max rpm and I am going to go out to run the high desert and I find that I lost about 400 to 500 rpms on the top end what position change would net me those rpms back to get me back on peak torque. Is it a 200 rpm change going from B-1 to A-1 or is it less or more?

I run sleds and I know moving the spring one hole is about a 200 rpm change on sleds, just looking for approximate change between settings.
 

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look at his chart b-i is the softest you won't lower the rpm more than that every adj is to make more rpm on flat or on roads changing to a stiffer rate will slow you down unless your will not hit 6900 then it will help if you are short on rpm say yours only runs at 6300 you need to stiffen spring rate move to next on chart and see rpm gain then you'll know not saying you have a weak motor you might have a weak spring there not all exact i hit 6600 on take off and keeps building to 7450 that is a piss poor clutching from a snowmobile company that know clutching thats why I'm getting wcd kit it will be night and day different that is my only complaint guess they need something to change for next year
 
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