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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
wanting to put some new plugs in the wildcat x. from what i can find it looks like its using a NGK CPR8E. Nothing against NGK but id like to put a better plug in it. what are you guys using? Id like to run some E3 plugs but it looks like they only make a set for the canam.
 

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I never got to bent out of shape over what brand plug to use. I ran a lot of 2 strokes, and NGK was by far the best. I use them on my Kitty Kat. No fouls, no problems. I'll just stick with those.
 

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A plug is a plug, IMO. Never bought into that special plug this, different materials that. Like everything else, just another way to make you spend more money on something that is not needed.
 
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I agree with SandSissy, I've run NGK in all my power sport equipment. Always worked great and never had any failures. I figure if that's what they put in it and tested it with, that's what I'm going to stay with. I've tried those E3 plugs before in my snowmobiles and all I noticed was they cost 10 times more. LOL!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sounds like I know what direction to take. Ive had good luck with ngk before and Im not into paying more without any kind of improvement. Thanks guys
 

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I used to work in Autolite r&d and did a ton of competitor plug testing for benchmarking and new plug design.

First off a gimmick plug is always going to be a gimmick. E3s came out when I was there so obviously with Autolite still owning the IP on the Split fire plug we were interested in the claims. Bottom line was the plug gap grew terribly in wear tests due to the extremely low quality and soft material they used for the ground strap. Second off they offered no performance gain. Autolite had several engine dynos running 24/7 and these plugs did nothing positive.

The only REAL way to gain performance with a spark plug is by going to a fine wire center electrode. This makes the spark more concentrated and it resists misfiring and fouling a lot better than a standard plug. It also allows you to run a slightly larger gap which can aid in flame front growth when compared to a plug with a standard electrode. Will you notice a HP gain? Probably not.

No, iridium plugs don't run hotter. Common misconception. Yes you can run them with nitrous or forced induction. It actually helps because the more concentrated spark aids in not getting spark blowout.

In my opinion, NGK or Denso are the highest build quality. Autolite XP is a close third and Champion is last. I'd run an Autolite or NGK iridium plug if it was my choice. Especially considering the Wildcat has been known to foul plugs.
 

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I used to work in Autolite r&d and did a ton of competitor plug testing for benchmarking and new plug design.

First off a gimmick plug is always going to be a gimmick. E3s came out when I was there so obviously with Autolite still owning the IP on the Split fire plug we were interested in the claims. Bottom line was the plug gap grew terribly in wear tests due to the extremely low quality and soft material they used for the ground strap. Second off they offered no performance gain. Autolite had several engine dynos running 24/7 and these plugs did nothing positive.

The only REAL way to gain performance with a spark plug is by going to a fine wire center electrode. This makes the spark more concentrated and it resists misfiring and fouling a lot better than a standard plug. It also allows you to run a slightly larger gap which can aid in flame front growth when compared to a plug with a standard electrode. Will you notice a HP gain? Probably not.

No, iridium plugs don't run hotter. Common misconception. Yes you can run them with nitrous or forced induction. It actually helps because the more concentrated spark aids in not getting spark blowout.

In my opinion, NGK or Denso are the highest build quality. Autolite XP is a close third and Champion is last. I'd run an Autolite or NGK iridium plug if it was my choice. Especially considering the Wildcat has been known to foul plugs.
This is why I would like to run an Iridium plug but seems NGK does not offer one at this time for the 1000H2
 

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In my opinion, NGK or Denso are the highest build quality. Autolite XP is a close third and Champion is last.
In my first 2 stroke I carried 2 or 3 extra Champion plugs 'cause they fouled all the time. That was why I started using NGK for almost everything. That being said, my lawn tractor runs on Champion, and that same plug has been in there around 12 years. Go figure.
 

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In my first 2 stroke I carried 2 or 3 extra Champion plugs 'cause they fouled all the time. That was why I started using NGK for almost everything. That being said, my lawn tractor runs on Champion, and that same plug has been in there around 12 years. Go figure.
Yeah 2 strokes especially can benefit from iridium tipped spark plugs. I noticed this immediately in my old Banshee days when I said "screw it, I'm getting the expensive plug!" and never changed it again lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Went with NGK. They've been reliable so far and I didn't see a reason to try anything else. Thanks for your 2 cents.
 

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I run Iridium plugs...the IU24 is the proper replacement for the CPR8. I noticed no differences other then they seem to be a little cleaner for my rich running Cat.

I included a link to the different plug types below

CPR8E>>>>NGK 7411 CPR8E Nickel Spark Plug

IU24>>>Denso 5362 IU24 Iridium Spark Plug

IU24A>>Denso 5365 IU24A Iridium Spark Plug


On Edit: If you do see a loss in power especially top end the Iridium at times will cause an engine to knock with poor fuel quality. They ran like crap in my V Rod.
 

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Nice cross referencing...thanx for posting that. What does the 'A' mean on the IU24A? Is that the Alumina powder coating they talk about? Jus wondered what the diff is.
 

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Sand that is the only thing I see as being the difference. The biggest caution is if you run your machine to the lean side you are going to need to make adjustments. The iridium do clean up some of the richer running machines I have.

Spark Plugs is probably one of the least understood items that we use on our machines. I do not ever remember seeing a spark plug thread and definitely not one that we discussed plug heat ranges.
 

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Nice cross referencing...thanx for posting that. What does the 'A' mean on the IU24A? Is that the Alumina powder coating they talk about? Jus wondered what the diff is.
The A is for the "angled" race cut ground strap. I pointed at the difference:
Auto part Metal Spark plug Screw Brass


The angle cut ground strap is thought to promote a better flame front but as seen as not as long lasting due to the eventual edge erosion that happens from the plug sparking directly to where the corner is. All of the Autolite Racing plugs are built this way.
 

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I was always told you should index your spark plugs so the ground electrode doesn't block the incoming fuel/air charge. I've done that on my snowmobiles, figuring it makes sense to have the full spark exposed to the incoming charge. Don't know if it makes any performance difference, but I figured it would be more efficient.
 
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