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So far ,,,, ill buy another set of brisk plugs. They r noticeably more effective. Ive waisted alot of cash trying all the hype on plugs. This is the only one ive found to be noticeably different. Ill buy a set for my mudrace truck to.
 

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So far ,,,, ill buy another set of brisk plugs. They r noticeably more effective. Ive waisted alot of cash trying all the hype on plugs. This is the only one ive found to be noticeably different. Ill buy a set for my mudrace truck to.
Hey I'm glad to hear you're having success!

What do you notice different about them?
 

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I think I will be trying the NGK CR8EIX next plug change, they have the same specs and that is what I use in raptor.
 

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I think I will be trying the NGK CR8EIX next plug change, they have the same specs and that is what I use in raptor.
Only problem with that spark plug is that its not a projected tip. I did some research comparing whats out there vs what we need and there isn't a perfect match from NGK in their iridium tipped line.

The problem with not having a projected tip is that the spark plug actually sits further away from the combustion chamber. The heat range and compatibility is still equal, but it may not give the best performance.
 

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The fine wire electrode can fire at a lower voltage, all else being equal. That would permit a slightly larger gap, which might help with lean misfire due to a cold engine or sharp throttle increase. A bigger gap and improved flame front profile might reduce octane demand a little. Platinum electrodes will hold a gap setting. Iridium? What does it offer?
 

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Just looking at the recessed tip, it looks like it might increase combustion chamber volume a little, reducing compression. I'd think it would foul a little more easily, too. A projected tip would probably pick up more combustion heat, but it would get better cooling from the next incoming charge of air/gas, so its temperature at the top of the compression stroke might actually be lower than a similar range recessed tip. I'd think that would help it resist fouling and prevent detonation/dieseling. I've run a lot of junk, and I've never seen a projected tip plug get as coked up as some recessed tip plugs do.
 

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The fine wire electrode can fire at a lower voltage, all else being equal. That would permit a slightly larger gap, which might help with lean misfire due to a cold engine or sharp throttle increase. A bigger gap and improved flame front profile might reduce octane demand a little. Platinum electrodes will hold a gap setting. Iridium? What does it offer?
From what I recall the iridium tip is an alloy mixed with platinum and rhodium. The biggest advantage of it is its anti-wear properties that aid gap longevity. Gap growth is incredibly low even after a 100k mile simulated dyno test. I actually came across an old flash drive that had some test photos on it, but I probably wont post those. The gap growth was literally non-existent on an Autolite XP plug whereas the Denso plugs ground strap wore down. Not so important on a SXS though.
 

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I run Iridium plugs...the IU24 is the proper replacement for the CPR8. I noticed no differences other then they seem to be a little cleaner for my rich running Cat.

I included a link to the different plug types below

CPR8E>>>>NGK 7411 CPR8E Nickel Spark Plug

IU24>>>Denso 5362 IU24 Iridium Spark Plug

IU24A>>Denso 5365 IU24A Iridium Spark Plug


On Edit: If you do see a loss in power especially top end the Iridium at times will cause an engine to knock with poor fuel quality. They ran like crap in my V Rod.
My WC 1000 was taking a few seconds to start cold so I figured I'd change plugs and give the Denso IU24 a try. Not taken it out yet, but now she starts INSTANTLY.
The NKGs I took out didn't look bad, and not saying that new NKGs wouldn't start just as quick, but the Denso impression is very good so far.
Thank you WildcatManiac for the cross reference!

Text
 

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Sorry, I can't help with what you need to remove to get to the plugs. I don't own a Wildcat, yet, but I may be able to shed some light on the spark plug topic due to experience with a 650 H1.

Had a Prowler 650 H1 that came with a Champion RG6YC. Crosses to an NGK CR8E. The original Champion lasted about 6 months. The NGK CR8E would last about a month. Went to a CR7E and they would last a little longer, but they would still fail and the 7E is a hotter plug. So we tried an Autolite 4303, crosses to the NGK CR8E and the Champion RG6YC, and the 4303 always gave us the longest life. About 6-8 months.

The largest problem with this Prowler was it had a Keihin 36 CVK carb with an automatic choke. I put a 36 Keihin CVK with a manual choke on it from a Vinson with all the Prowler jets installed. That made the plug last even longer because the auto choke was flooding it a slight bit and fowling plugs. It idled smoother after doing this and ran great and started much, much better. I always kept using the Autolite 4303 because it gave the best results with the faulty auto choke carb.

I know the Wildcat is fuel injected, but the Autolite 4303 was superior in the Prowler H1, so it may be superior in the H2 as well.
 

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What is the easiest way to change the plugs. I don't think my hands will fit to the front one. Awful tight to rear one. Is it easier taking bed off and can you get to the front one
Thanks
Best to remove the rear cover, driver side rear cover and bed. Same parts necessary to adjust the valves. After that much effort I would only use Iridium plugs. If the fueling is already spot on they won't add much but they will fire better under less than perfect conditions.
 
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