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The bushing is less than $10 shipped from Amazon, so pretty competitive.

The bushing is a tight fit. Use the rack rod to guide it into the housing and start it with a few light taps with a suitable soft/dead blow hammer. Then extend the rack rod and reinstall the tie rod assembly to the rack, leaving the wheel end un-done. Using the power steering unit, go full left lock, then spin the steering wheel to the right. Don't keep the steering wheel turned right after the bushing stops moving, just use it to deliver several pulls on the bushing until it is flush.

My unit initially groaned a bit as I worked the steering. I extended the rack full left and sprayed the rod with a Teflon lube. I repeated this 2 or 3 times. After that, the steering was silent.

Here is the thread on my DIY double shear mount.
 

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The missing bushing is the main cause for rack failure. I feel that the reason the mounts are failing is do to fasteners working loos. When I installed the bushing I discovered the bolts were not tight. Looked it but not tight.
 

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I suspect Joe E is 100% correct regarding the fasteners. There is a lot of leverage working on the fasteners with just the OEM mount. The double shear mounts reduce that leverage significantly, particularly the ones that tie to the spacers on either side of the diff. It is a very short span from the rack to the spacers, and that assembly (subframe, bolt, spacers, etc) is pretty stout.
20201003_151414[1].jpg
 

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The missing bushing is the main cause for rack failure. I feel that the reason the mounts are failing is do to fasteners working loos. When I installed the bushing I discovered the bolts were not tight. Looked it but not tight.
The frame flexes right there. Look at the huge hole in the upper bulk head for where the steering shaft has to come through. It doesn't help that the plate itself is so thin. I added plate work from the top of the bulkhead (where the radiator sits) down to where he top of the steering rack mounts. I also removed the welded nuts inside the bulkhead that the upper rack mount bolts to. And I replaced them with custom bungs that weld up through the top of the bulkhead. It strengthened that section much more to where it doesn't flex like that at all.

Double shear certainly helps, but there are numerous issues on the front of this car that need to be addressed from the fabrication department.
 

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The frame flexes right there. Look at the huge hole in the upper bulk head for where the steering shaft has to come through. It doesn't help that the plate itself is so thin. I added plate work from the top of the bulkhead (where the radiator sits) down to where he top of the steering rack mounts. I also removed the welded nuts inside the bulkhead that the upper rack mount bolts to. And I replaced them with custom bungs that weld up through the top of the bulkhead. It strengthened that section much more to where it doesn't flex like that at all.

Double shear certainly helps, but there are numerous issues on the front of this car that need to be addressed from the fabrication department.
In my case I replaced the nuts holding the rack, torqued them and used blue lock tire. So far no problems. I'll keep checking the mounting plate.
 
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