Wildcat Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much better can you make the stock clutch without going to a WCD kit? Has anyone determined if the Cat has good engine braking? If not, will a modified stock clutch help? What about the WCD? Does it help with engine braking? We ride very steep mountain terrain and this is very important, otherwise brakes are going to be at a premium. Man a manual shift would be sweet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
If you want to get your shift out point dialed in and get some better bottom , mid, and top end pull from the Wildcat then have Airdam (Adam) do a stage 5 clutch set up for you and call it quits.

If you are not going to run a turbo with lot's of boost the wet clutch will work fine. If you run a turbo with 10 -12 psi it will still work for you. My estimate is anything over 130 rwhp might need a wcd. A lot of this depends on how you ride and treat your vehicle as well. If you are the kind of guy that is going to stand on the brakes rev to max rpm and release the brake in the street to try an wheelie then the wet clutch will burn up after a while. There is a a lot of negative talk about the wet clutch but the reality is it can also be a good thing and save you from smoking your belt. Also use common sense when you are putting a lot of load on the car when you are climbing hills in the desert and doing technical stuff it's best to leave the trans in low range. A lot of people burn belts and fry wet clutches by trying to run high range all the time. Low works great to about 45mph on my XTZ. Now the big problem will be your spike load damper in the rear end. This can be replaced by a slug that Dean Bullock sells through his Arctic Cat dealership and they work great as I have tested them. I will add the picture at the bottom. This is just my perspective after running the Turbo XTZ fro a while now. There are many opinions so stand by and keep reading cause I'm sure they will come. Good luck to you sir. Let us know how it goes.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Like all Cats the engine braking is excellent. I assume (correct me if I'm wrong) that the wet clutch deletes people do use a traditional snowmobile style clutch like Polaris uses. If that is the case you will lose your low speed engine braking.

The stock clutch is excellent for all but the most radical boosted engines. Of course you may make some adjustments with machining and different roller weights but it won't be earth shattering.

For the 2012 Kawasaki Teryx 4 Kawasaki redesigned their 750 V-twin to eliminate the snowmobile style clutch. In its place they are now using a wet clutch identical to what is in the Prowler/Rhino/Wildcat. They did that because for the vast majority of folks it is a superior design. Better engine braking, smoother engagement and much longer belt life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Like cluelessrookie said the engine braking on cats works very well for the slow technical down hill shit as well as conserving your brakes.

The Arctic Cat uses a 1 way bearing for engine braking and I believe when I tested the first wet clutch delete we left the 1 way bearing in and still had the same engine braking as stock. Adam if you read this please correct me if I am wrong since it's been a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
arctic cats traditional wet clutch style clutches use a one-way bearing in place on the wet clutch hub itself. alot of people have noted that the wildcats in testing had little to no engine braking. arctic cat may have intentionally left the one-way bearing out of the wildcats to allow them to free-wheel down hills easier. i wont know till this next week but i will let everyone know soon exactly what is in the production units. there is plenty of work to be done to the stock clutches, machining, helix changes, low end, midrange, and top speed gains to be had, faster acceleration, and better throttle response. depending on exactly how the production units are set up, there may be quite a few things we shall do but i plan on doing all the testing and finding out where the sweet spot in next week.

on the wet clutch delete, i use a snowmobile style primary clutch, that retains a one-way bearing. so you will have superior engine braking. it grabs better than any other clutch like it, fits under the stock housing, keeps a one-way bearing, and runs a taller gear ratio for more top speeds. i plan on finding out if the top speed on the production units is in the ECU, or the clutching. it appears to be in the clutching from my initial thoughts of seeing online vids of the production units online. if the speed is being goverened in the clutch like all other arctic cats, the WCD will give a good bit more MPH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
All three of our Cats have manuals so it is very easy to control downhill speed. Even then we run in low range most of the time. I would plan to do the same with the WC. I know that AC has one of the best clutches on the market. I don't have a problem keeping the wet clutch since I have seen Polaris and others eat belts like candy. Just want to maximize what is there. Bottom end and mid range is what I would be interested in anyway. Not much need for 80mph in the mountains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Adam's machined clutch was well worth the $$ on my XTZ.

Pulls like a tank now I really like the wet clutch and don't see why everyone is haters.

The most recent vid shows the WC pulls right with the XP even with the wet clutch it is not all that bad plus it is a lot easier on parts.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top