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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I tried to PM Airdam about this but haven't gotten any response. Does anyone know how much difference there is between a heavily modified wet clutch and the wet clutch delete? Are they close? On the Airdam website a stage 5 mod is about 1/2 the price of the WCD. The only reason I am really wondering is that keeping the original clutch would probably keep you under warranty. Most of the guys who work on these things for the dealers may not even notice the machined sheave and replaced weights and rollers. However, they would immediately notice a totally different clutch set up...........................
 

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We should have a new sheave and roller combo tested by the end of next week. My fab guy is saying for $500 bucks he'll have the clutching dialed. The cat has plenty of power, just need to get it to the wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Kinda what I was thinking too Cranes. Just don't want to be disappointed and wish I woulda spent the extra money on the delete...........
 

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I might wait until the warranty period is up, but I do see several very good reasons to delete the wet clutch.

1. If you're going to go to the trouble to beef up the stock clutch, deleting it might not be much more work, if at all.

2. The stock wet clutch is probably a source of slippage, especially if you start making more power.

3. I've never liked the idea of a friction surface bathed in oil. I know they do work, but they use dry clutches on street cars for a reason.

4. As the clutch material grinds off, you get gritty debris in the oil. Very abrasive stuff, it's not good for bearings and such.

5. Most importantly, if you ever get the chance to take 7 or 8 lbs of rotating mass off of the flywheel, it will sure wake up an engine, especially a small engine like this.

If you seriously want to put some power to the ground and smoke some XPs with minimal expense, I think the WCD kit, ECU tune and a nice exhaust system will be all you need to pass any XP that's non turbo.
 

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For those that don't wanna immediately void their warranty, the modifications to the stock clutches would easily be overlooked by dealers. i have never had someone tell me their dealer void their warranty because they noticed any of my machining. I can say that the mods to the stock clutches are a definite improvement over stock. Machining the primary alone will net about 18-22% lower gear ratio at take-off. The " Machined sheaves" that you see most others offering for Yamaha machines are guys machining the roller valleys deeper to allow the rollers to have a greater travel but usually only net 5-10% lower gearing and about 10% taller gear ratio. The stage 1 primary machining is cheap and nets 20% lower gearing. With the stage 2 and 3 done you'll gain nearly 15% taller gearing as well. With the stage 5 work done you will net nearly 25% taller gear ratio over stock. Doing stages 1-5 is more than most owners need but will net you TONS more low end lighter primary netting faster acceleration stronger midrange as well as more top speeds. Its a good all around setup and will put more power to the ground. The only weak link is the wet clutches. I am unsure of how long these wet clutches are going to last on these heavy big power machines. Doing the math after seeing the hp numbers to the tire, these engines are making 82-84ish to the crank. After working on the first production wildcat and taking out the wet clutch, that machine had 25 miles, and the wet clutch shoes were already blackened meaning they had been slipped enough to create enough heat to put a blackened sheen on the tops of the shoes. Eeventually these shoes are gonna go out from heat and slippage with these heavy machines with their power. Machining the primary and tweaking it the secondary and all can put more power to the ground but you still gotta power robbing slipping wet clutch
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Adam. Can you give an approximate comparison between doing all 5 stages and doing the WCD? Is it 25%, 50%, 75% of what the WCD gives you??
 

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I am waiting on delivery like so many others, and doing upgrade planning in the meantime. Are there any cons to the WCD, besides the warranty void that anyone can foresee in the future
 

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Seems pretty obvious the stock clutch setup needs some major rework if this things making that kinda horsepower.
 

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My wcd is getting done with the purchase price, already decided that. I've driven it both ways and the super fast rev is amazing with the wcd. Love it. I just hope Airdam isn't too swamped to turn it back around quick. I want to get it done before I go, but will probably be after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Is it like a core exchange deal with the WCD? Do you send him yours and he sends you one back? Or can you just pay $1250 and order one? I can't imagine that its too terribly difficult to install. The worst part is breaking that nut loose on your clutch the first time........
 

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I race jestkies (World Champ 2010) We reduce the weight of the flywheel about 2.25 lbs and the difference is amazing
so i beleive the 7-8 pounds less in the WCD may work well the big question I have is how reliable the engine is going to be after that mod? more since the engine is working slightly less or less reliable since now is spining faster? another question is if you have an issue with the motor not related to the WCD and you need to take it back to the dealer can you put the clucht back to stock?? or what do you need to pu it back to stock I'm not sure but a few of us will consider to buy and extended warranty specially in this new unit and they will void it if the clutch or any other thing is being mod (I allways keep all the stock parts to put back to stock)
so the big question is to AIRDAM can we buy the stuff needed to do the WCD with out removing the existing parts? and if so roughly how much more it will be ????
 

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I agree with you hxloco..... I bought an extended warranty just for the sheer fact this is a first year model. Yeah the motor is proven but you never know with all this new drivetrain stuff and the electrical system.

My question is why is AC sticking with a wet clutch. I can only imagine they wanted to leave room for improvement with the wildcat so why not use something they are already producing and has been proven. I am sure they will convert eventually. The cost savings alone for them would have to be enough ie. machining, fluid, weight, and extra material.

If someone knows chime in.
 

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This is going to be a very naive thought since I am not yet familiar with the typical clutching on SXS's, but I find it baffling why there has not been a better design to these wet clutches. Somebody questioned the capabilities of wet clutches. Although it is different with manual trannies, MX bikes making 60+ HP and modified street bikes making 100+ all have friction plates bathed in oil. The question I have is why the hell doesn't one of these manufacturers try to somehow incorporate the idea? Anybody ever hear of a Rekluse? Better yet, get rid of these shitty belt systems altogether and make a manual tranny. SERIOUSLY
 

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This is going to be a very naive thought since I am not yet familiar with the typical clutching on SXS's, but I find it baffling why there has not been a better design to these wet clutches. Somebody questioned the capabilities of wet clutches. Although it is different with manual trannies, MX bikes making 60+ HP and modified street bikes making 100+ all have friction plates bathed in oil. The question I have is why the hell doesn't one of these manufacturers try to somehow incorporate the idea? Anybody ever hear of a Rekluse? Better yet, get rid of these shitty belt systems altogether and make a manual tranny. SERIOUSLY

The first thought that comes to mind is a CVT works better for rock crawling. You can use a smaller engine, let it get to it's torque peak, and the gearing starts from 0 and goes up in an infinitely variable fashion. I've seen videos of stock UTVs that drove up to a stucco wall, put the front tire up against it, and just started climbing straight up the wall.

You can't do that with a Jeep, or any manual tranny vehicle then turn around and hit 75-80 mph unless you've got some sort of under/over drive setup, which is pretty expensive and adds a lot of weight.
 

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RPM, that's what I've been wondering ever since the first "sport" sxs started coming out. Why no manual? I understand a CVT for low powered farm/ranch duty, but not for what every one really uses these things for. I'm no expert but I don't get it either. Maybe some one can enlighten us?
 

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Hmmmm. I buy the concept, but sorry, just not good enough for me. I have always had manuals in my Jeeps for rock crawling. Figure out a 4:1 system in a transfer case of the sorts. That idea has been around 70 years. I built an FJ40 with a SM420/Dana 300. I could crawl up a tree and still do 85 on a 1:1 final. Later I built a 2WD CJ5 for the dunes with an NV4500 that had gearing in the low 5's WITH an overdrive that got me to 100mph with ease on a low HP motor. My point is that there is no need to reinvent the wheel. The technology has been around forever. I just think the issue is all these manufacturers are caught up in the same ideas that got this sport started: UTILITY. EF that idea. If you're going to build something for sport and label it as such, then offer 2 models: a 4wd with CVT and a 2wd with manual. Get out of the cave.
 
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