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Discussion Starter #1
I was pretty happy with the suspension of my trail thru most terrain but when it came to jumping any kind of bigger jump I wasn't having any luck from keeping the back end from going over so it was pretty easy to figure out the shocks were bottoming out, so I ordered a set of Bandit 200/240 springs. The Bandit springs helped big time but it was still landing nose heavy, so I figured I would tear the rears apart and re valve them and add a schrader valve so they could be charged back up easier. I found a guy on ebay that sells and rebuilds shocks that helped me out on some hard to find parts so I called him up and he sells the seal kit and can get you any fox shims you need+ oil and I bought 4 schrader valves so I wouldn't need a needle to charge the shocks anymore, if your interested in the company just pm me and I will tell you the name. after I rebuilt and re valved the compression and rebound to slow them down it seemed to help quite a lot but found out that the front was compressing all the way to the bump stop so I re valved the fronts only on the compression side to slow it down a tad. it helped quite a bit but would like to slow it down some more to get the car to land a little more flat.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I have a needle to fill/drain the shocks its basically a hypodermic needle attached to a schrader valve. you have to remove the bushings in the top cap to get to the plug. The needle is not long enough to go thru the top of the cap into the plu so you have to bend the needle and go thru the side where the bushings go and let the nitrogen out so you can take the shock apart. then the other end (bump stop side) you need a chisel to tap the dust cap off, after that you can put it in a vice upside down so you can push the seal down enough to get the wire ring out, you can use a little screw driver or a bent pick. after you get the wire ring out you can just pull it apart and dump out the oil. to remove the floating piston you have to reinsert the fill needle after the shock is apart and add some compressed air (maybe 20psi) and it will push it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
the next part would be easier to do if you remove the top fill cap to add the schrader valve but it has loctite on it and you need a special rubber tool to tighten in in a vice so you can remove it without damaging the tube so I just drilled and tapped the cap with it still attached to the shock tube. in the pic you can see where I center punched to drill the hole. I started out with I think it was around 1/16 and drilled it at a 90 degrees from the flat that I center punched ( you want it to break thru not quite in the middle of the cap (so you do not drill into the rubber plug) now comes the tricky part, you need a 1/8 27 npt and drill size R (.339) you have to drill only enough so you dont drill all the way thru the cap (you only want the 1/16 drill to go thru, so you have to drill a little bit at a time and keep checking. I think 2 of the 4 I drilled just started to almost break thru. When your done drilling then I used a 1/8 27 npt with some tap magic and tapped it as far as I could (you have to be careful because if you bottom the tap out and keep turning it you might strip out the soft aluminum because your not able to run the tap very deep so keep checking) I had an extra tap so I ground the end of it down a few threads so I could tap it a little deeper in the hole. after I finished tapping the hole I cleaned and debured all chips inside and out, then cleaned the oil out of the threads with some brake cleaner and used red loctite and screwed and tightened the schrader valve in.​
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
my seals all looked good so I didn't need to change them so I disassembled the valve shim stack, on the compression side I only added a .010 thick 1.100 diameter shim on top of the .012 thick 1.100 diameter. On the rebound the first two .010 thick 1.098 diameter I changed to .015 thick 1.100 diameter. I have rebuilt quite a few different kinds of shocks but I am not a re valving master so what ever shims you want to change are up to you but I wouldn't mind hearing any way you would do it different. I have to find my notes as to what shims were changed on the compression side.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Now take the shock tube and clamp the shock bushing side in the vise so the open end is on top and insert the internal floating piston (bottom pic) with a little shock oil on the oring, I used a flat scale to set the depth (rears it is 7.66 inches) (front is 7.13 inches) I just use a screw driver or something to push it down (it fits pretty tight) measuring it as you go, measure from the top of the ifp to the top of the shock tube. if you push it down too far then you can use some compressed air to push it back (low pressure) when you get it at the right height get your shock oil 7.5 weight and fill the tube to the top, then comes the tricky part, you take the shock rod with piston/wiper assembled and stick it slowly in the shock tube and work it up and down a bunch of times to get all the air bubbles out, it takes some practice because if you push too hard then you will feel the internal floating piston move inside the tube then you will have to reset the height again. after you have worked it about 7 or 8 times you need to push the piston all the way down inside the tube until the internal bump stop (first pic on right black rubber ring) is even with the top of the tube (your oil level should still be at the top of the tube) then pull the shock rod to one side of the tube so the rubber of the internal bump stop is over one side of the tube and push down till it hits the top of the tube (I wish i took a picture of this part) then take a soft rubber mallet and give it a decent tap down, what that will do is help get all the air trapped inside the valve shims out without moving the internal floating piston. then push the seal head into the tube just far enough to get the wire retainer in. after that all you should have to do is fill it to 200psi with nitrogen, then you can push the shock down and it should feel smooth if it still has air in it you should be able to feel it while you hold the shock while working it up and down with some force.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
my shock tubes looked like my springs were rubbing on them (not sure if it was the old crappy arctic cats or the bandits) so I added some shrink tubing so it would have to rub thru that before rubbing the tubes. the adjustments I made to the valving in my opinion they made a difference but not a huge difference, I think if your thinking of the new Superatv arms and running these shock you will need to adjust the valving quite a bit more aggressive than what I did. If I missed anything let me know, I wish I would have taken some more pictures while working on them but after finishing them I have yet to read about anyone rebuilding/upgrading valving so I figured I would give it a shot and do a half assed write up. so far I have been pretty happy with the performance of these shocks after going thru them, I would still like to try and slow down the compression on the fronts some more but will probably wait till next year.
 

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My Racertech springs rub where the dual rate split in the rear shock is. It gets mud and grit in the spacer. Thanks for this. I'm prolly going to give it a go too.


my shock tubes looked like my springs were rubbing on them (not sure if it was the old crappy arctic cats or the bandits) so I added some shrink tubing so it would have to rub thru that before rubbing the tubes. the adjustments I made to the valving in my opinion they made a difference but not a huge difference, I think if your thinking of the new Superatv arms and running these shock you will need to adjust the valving quite a bit more aggressive than what I did. If I missed anything let me know, I wish I would have taken some more pictures while working on them but after finishing them I have yet to read about anyone rebuilding/upgrading valving so I figured I would give it a shot and do a half assed write up. so far I have been pretty happy with the performance of these shocks after going thru them, I would still like to try and slow down the compression on the fronts some more but will probably wait till next year.
 
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